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Review

It’s No Has Bean: A Review of the Effects of White Kidney Bean Extract on Body Composition and Metabolic Health

1
Human Nutrition Research Centre, Population Health Sciences Institute, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE2 4HH, UK
2
School of Agriculture and Food Science, University College Dublin, 4 Dublin, Ireland
3
Biosciences Institute, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE2 4HH, UK
4
Wellcome Centre for Mitochondrial Research, Translational and Clinical Research Institute, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE2 4HH, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Shared last authorship.
Nutrients 2020, 12(5), 1398; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12051398
Received: 11 April 2020 / Revised: 27 April 2020 / Accepted: 2 May 2020 / Published: 13 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Modifications and Human Health)
The rising prevalence of overweight and obesity is a global concern, increasing the risk of numerous non-communicable diseases and reducing quality of life. A healthy diet and exercise remain the cornerstone treatments for obesity. However, adherence rates can be low and the effectiveness of these interventions is often less than anticipated, due to compensatory changes in other aspects of the energy balance equation. Whilst some alternative weight-loss therapies are available, these strategies are often associated with side effects and are expensive. An alternative or adjunct to traditional weight-loss approaches may be the use of bioactive compounds extracted from food sources, which can be incorporated into habitual diet with a low cost and minimal burden. One product which has attracted attention in this regard is white kidney bean extract (WKBE), which has been suggested to inhibit the enzyme α-amylase, limiting carbohydrate digestion and absorption with small but potentially meaningful attendant beneficial effects on body weight and metabolic health. In this review, drawing evidence from both human and animal studies, we discuss the current evidence around the effects of WKBE on body composition and metabolic health. In addition, we discuss evidence on the safety of this supplement and explore potential directions for future research. View Full-Text
Keywords: white kidney beans; metabolic health; obesity; body composition; α-amylase; Phaseolus vulgaris L. white kidney beans; metabolic health; obesity; body composition; α-amylase; Phaseolus vulgaris L.
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MDPI and ACS Style

Nolan, R.; Shannon, O.M.; Robinson, N.; Joel, A.; Houghton, D.; Malcomson, F.C. It’s No Has Bean: A Review of the Effects of White Kidney Bean Extract on Body Composition and Metabolic Health. Nutrients 2020, 12, 1398. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12051398

AMA Style

Nolan R, Shannon OM, Robinson N, Joel A, Houghton D, Malcomson FC. It’s No Has Bean: A Review of the Effects of White Kidney Bean Extract on Body Composition and Metabolic Health. Nutrients. 2020; 12(5):1398. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12051398

Chicago/Turabian Style

Nolan, Ruth, Oliver M. Shannon, Natassia Robinson, Abraham Joel, David Houghton, and Fiona C. Malcomson. 2020. "It’s No Has Bean: A Review of the Effects of White Kidney Bean Extract on Body Composition and Metabolic Health" Nutrients 12, no. 5: 1398. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12051398

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