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Open AccessArticle

Thiamine Deficiency in Adolescents with Eating Disorders: A Prospective Cohort Study

by 1,2,*,†, 2,3,†, 2,4, 2,4 and 1,2
1
Department of Pediatrics, Shamir Medical Center, Zerifin 70300, Israel
2
Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978, Israel
3
Outpatient Day Hospital for Eating Disorders, Shamir Medical Center, Zerifin 70300, Israel
4
Clinical Chemistry Laboratory, Shamir Medical Center, Zerifin 70300, Israel
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Hilla Bahat and Gad Reisler contributed equally to this work.
Nutrients 2020, 12(5), 1396; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12051396
Received: 1 April 2020 / Revised: 10 May 2020 / Accepted: 12 May 2020 / Published: 13 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Clinical Nutrition)
Background: Pediatric eating disorders (PED) patients are prone to nutritional deficiencies. Thiamine deficiency is well described in other malnutrition states but is not routinely screened for in PED. In the current study we evaluated the prevalence of thiamine deficiency among PED patients on their first admission to an outpatient day hospital for eating disorders (DH). Methods: In this prospective cohort study, we measured whole blood thiamine pyrophosphate concentrations (TPP) in addition to a routine laboratory workup in 69 girls on their first admission to DH. Two subgroup analyses were performed: (I) Patients with a previous dietary intervention (“diet” group, n = 30) or naïve-to-treatment patients (“naïve” group, n = 39) and (II) Type of PED: Restrictive (group R, n = 44) or binge-eating/purging (group BP, n = 25). Results: Thiamine deficiency was identified in four girls (6%), all in the “naïve” group. Three of them had BP, and one had R. Patients in the “diet” group had a significantly higher TPP compared to the “naïve” group (55.5 µg/L vs. 46.7 µg/L, p = 0.004). TPP levels returned to normal after two weeks of the treatment program in all deficient patients. Conclusion: Thiamine deficiency was uncommon among PED patients and was easily replenished. Screening for deficiency should be performed among treatment-naïve patients. Keynotes: Whole blood thiamine pyrophosphate concentrations (TPP) are seldom screened for among PED patients. In the current study, we detected thiamine deficiency in only 6% of patients on their first admission to an outpatient day hospital for eating disorders. All deficient patients did not have a recent dietary intervention. We recommend considering screening for thiamine deficiency in treatment-naïve PED patients. View Full-Text
Keywords: pediatric eating disorder; thiamine deficiency; dietary intervention pediatric eating disorder; thiamine deficiency; dietary intervention
MDPI and ACS Style

Bahat, H.; Reisler, G.; Brandriss, N.; Bar-Chaim, A.; Goldman, M. Thiamine Deficiency in Adolescents with Eating Disorders: A Prospective Cohort Study. Nutrients 2020, 12, 1396. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12051396

AMA Style

Bahat H, Reisler G, Brandriss N, Bar-Chaim A, Goldman M. Thiamine Deficiency in Adolescents with Eating Disorders: A Prospective Cohort Study. Nutrients. 2020; 12(5):1396. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12051396

Chicago/Turabian Style

Bahat, Hilla; Reisler, Gad; Brandriss, Nurit; Bar-Chaim, Adina; Goldman, Michael. 2020. "Thiamine Deficiency in Adolescents with Eating Disorders: A Prospective Cohort Study" Nutrients 12, no. 5: 1396. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12051396

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