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Open AccessArticle

A Low-Glycemic Index, High-Fiber, Pulse-Based Diet Improves Lipid Profile, but Does Not Affect Performance in Soccer Players

1
College of Kinesiology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5B2, Canada
2
College of Pharmacy and Nutrition, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5A2, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(5), 1324; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12051324
Received: 16 March 2020 / Revised: 30 April 2020 / Accepted: 2 May 2020 / Published: 6 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition for Human Health, Performance and Recovery)
Pulses (i.e., lentils, chickpeas, beans, peas) are low-glycemic index, high-fiber foods that are beneficial for improving blood lipids. Young soccer players typically have low dietary fiber intake, perhaps because of concerns regarding gastro-intestinal problems during exercise performance. Twenty-seven (17 females) soccer players were randomized to receive a pulse-based diet or their regular diet for four weeks in a cross-over study and evaluated for changes in blood lipids and athletic performance, with 19 (22 ± 6y; 12 females) completing the study (eight participants withdrew because of lack of time). Women increased high density lipoproteins (+0.5 ± 0.7 vs. −0.6 ± 0.3 mmol/L; p < 0.01) and reduced total cholesterol to high density lipoprotein ratio (−2.4 ± 2.9 vs. +2.6 ± 2.2; p < 0.01) on the pulse-based vs. regular diet, respectively, while there were no differences between diet phases in men. Athletic performance assessed by distance covered during games by a global positioning system was not significantly different during the pulse-based vs. regular diet (9180 ± 1618 vs. 8987 ± 1808 m per game; p = 0.35). It is concluded that a pulse-based diet can improve blood lipid profile without affecting athletic performance in soccer players. View Full-Text
Keywords: lentils; chickpeas; beans; peas; exercise; endurance; aerobic; global positioning system lentils; chickpeas; beans; peas; exercise; endurance; aerobic; global positioning system
MDPI and ACS Style

Mizelman, E.; Chilibeck, P.D.; Hanifi, A.; Kaviani, M.; Brenna, E.; Zello, G.A. A Low-Glycemic Index, High-Fiber, Pulse-Based Diet Improves Lipid Profile, but Does Not Affect Performance in Soccer Players. Nutrients 2020, 12, 1324.

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