Next Article in Journal
A Low-Glycemic Index, High-Fiber, Pulse-Based Diet Improves Lipid Profile, but Does Not Affect Performance in Soccer Players
Next Article in Special Issue
Why Is Zeaxanthin the Most Concentrated Xanthophyll in the Central Fovea?
Previous Article in Journal
The Role of Preoperative Parenteral Nutrition
Previous Article in Special Issue
Pyropia yezoensis Extract Suppresses IFN-Gamma- and TNF-Alpha-Induced Proinflammatory Chemokine Production in HaCaT Cells via the Down-Regulation of NF-κB
Open AccessArticle

Efficacy of Commercially Available Nutritional Supplements: Analysis of Serum Uptake, Macular Pigment Optical Density and Visual Functional Response

1
College of Arts, Science and Education, Florida International University, Miami, FL 33199, USA
2
College of Optometry, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA 91766, USA
3
Guardion Health Sciences Inc, San Diego, CA 92128, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(5), 1321; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12051321
Received: 7 April 2020 / Revised: 28 April 2020 / Accepted: 2 May 2020 / Published: 6 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carotenoids in Human Nutrition)
Purpose: To compare the change in serum carotenoids, macular pigment optical density (MPOD) and visual function with the intake of two commercially available nutritional supplements. Methods: Participants were given a 24-week supply of a lipid-based micronized liquid medical food, Lumega-Z™ (LM), containing 28 mg of the macular carotenoids lutein (L), zeaxanthin (Z) and meso-zeaxanthin (MZ), or given PreserVision™ AREDS 2 Formula (gel-caps; PV) containing 12 mg of the macular carotenoids L and Z, but no reported MZ. Serum levels of L, Z and MZ were obtained at baseline and after 12 weeks. Macular pigment optical densities (MPOD) and visual function were assessed at baseline and after 24 weeks. Results: Average blood serum concentrations of L, Z and MZ in the two groups at baseline were similar. The increases in L, Z and MZ were 0.434, 0.063 and 0.086 µmol/L vs. 0.100, 0.043 and 0.001 µmol/L, respectively, in the LM vs. PV group. From baseline to week 24, average MPOD in the LM-group increased by 0.064 from 0.418 to 0.482, whereas in the PV-group, it was essentially unchanged (0.461 to 0.459;). Although log-contrast sensitivity was improved in all groups under three conditions (photopic, mesopic and mesopic with glare), the change in log-contrast sensitivity was not statistically significant. Conclusion: Despite only a 2.3-fold higher carotenoid concentration than PV, LM supplementation provides approximately 3–4-fold higher absorption, which leads to a significant elevation of MPOD levels. View Full-Text
Keywords: lutein; zeaxanthin; meso-zeaxanthin; macular pigment optical density; PreserVision; Lumega-Z; contrast sensitivity lutein; zeaxanthin; meso-zeaxanthin; macular pigment optical density; PreserVision; Lumega-Z; contrast sensitivity
MDPI and ACS Style

Bone, R.A.; Davey, P.G.; Roman, B.O.; Evans, D.W. Efficacy of Commercially Available Nutritional Supplements: Analysis of Serum Uptake, Macular Pigment Optical Density and Visual Functional Response. Nutrients 2020, 12, 1321.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop