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Open AccessArticle

Parental Concerns about Child and Adolescent Caffeinated Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Intake and Perceived Barriers to Reducing Consumption

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Department of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Milken Institute School of Public Health, The George Washington University, 950 New Hampshire Ave NW, Washington, DC 20052, USA
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Sumner M. Redstone Global Center for Prevention and Wellness, Milken Institute School of Public Health, The George Washington University, 950 New Hampshire Ave NW, Washington, DC 20052, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(4), 885; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12040885 (registering DOI)
Received: 2 March 2020 / Revised: 22 March 2020 / Accepted: 23 March 2020 / Published: 25 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Nutrition and Public Health)
Sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption contributes to obesity and chronic disease. SSB intake in children and adolescents remains well above recommendations and reducing intake is challenging. In addition to high sugar content, SSBs are the predominant source of caffeine among youth. However, whether caffeine in SSBs presents unique barriers to reducing consumption is unknown. Herein, we examine parental concerns about child caffeinated-SSB (CSSB) intake and describe parent-reported barriers to lowering their child’s consumption. In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with 21 parents of children and adolescents 8–17 years of age. Interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Transcripts were coded using Nvivo™, and key themes were identified. Most parents expressed concern about child CSSB consumption, primarily with regard to dietary (e.g., excess sugar), health (e.g., obesity, diabetes) and/or behavioral (e.g., hyperactivity) consequences of frequent intake. Several key barriers to CSSB restriction were reported, encompassing six emergent themes: widespread availability and accessibility; child non-compliance when asked not to drink CSSBs; peer and cultural influences; negative child response to CSSB restriction; family eating behaviors; and, child preferences for CSSBs versus other beverages. Consideration of these barriers, along with the development of novel approaches to address these challenges, will likely bolster success in interventions aimed at reducing CSSB intake among children and adolescents.
Keywords: sugar; caffeine; childhood obesity; beverage consumption; soda sugar; caffeine; childhood obesity; beverage consumption; soda
MDPI and ACS Style

Sylvetsky, A.C.; Visek, A.J.; Turvey, C.; Halberg, S.; Weisenberg, J.R.; Lora, K.; Sacheck, J. Parental Concerns about Child and Adolescent Caffeinated Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Intake and Perceived Barriers to Reducing Consumption. Nutrients 2020, 12, 885.

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