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Nutrition and the Immune System: A Complicated Tango

1
Section of Allergy & Immunology, School of Medicine, University of Colorado Denver, Children’s Hospital Colorado, Anschutz Medical Campus, 13123 East 16th Avenue, Aurora, CO 80045, USA
2
Center of Allergy and Environment (ZAUM), Technical University and Helmholtz Center Munich, Biedersteinerstrass 29, 80802 Munich, Germany
3
USDA/ARS Children’s Nutrition Research Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(3), 818; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12030818
Received: 10 February 2020 / Revised: 9 March 2020 / Accepted: 13 March 2020 / Published: 19 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Immunomodulation and Nutrition)
Enthusiasm exists for the potential of diet to impact the immune system, prevent disease and its therapeutic potential. Herein, we describe the challenge to nutrition scientists in defining this relationship through case studies of diets and nutrients in the context of allergic and autoimmune diseases. Moderate-quality evidence exists from both human intervention and observational studies to suggest that diet and individual nutrients can influence systemic markers of immune function and inflammation; numerous challenges exist for demonstrating the impact of defined diets and nutrient interventions on clearly influencing immune-mediated-clinical disease endpoints. A growing body of evidence suggests that further consideration of dietary patterns, immune system and gut microbiome composition and function, and subsequent epigenetic modifications are needed to improve our understanding of diet–immune system interactions. View Full-Text
Keywords: nutrition; omega-3 fatty acids; fiber; immune system; microbiome nutrition; omega-3 fatty acids; fiber; immune system; microbiome
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MDPI and ACS Style

Venter, C.; Eyerich, S.; Sarin, T.; Klatt, K.C. Nutrition and the Immune System: A Complicated Tango. Nutrients 2020, 12, 818.

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