Next Article in Journal
Gut Microbiota Dysbiosis in Patients with Biopsy-Proven Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Cross-Sectional Study in Taiwan
Previous Article in Journal
Nutrition and the Immune System: A Complicated Tango
Open AccessArticle

Obesogenic Lifestyle and Its Influence on Adiposity in Children and Adolescents, Evidence from Mexico

1
Clinical Epidemiology Research Unit, Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez, CP 06720 Mexico City, Mexico
2
Universidad Nacional Autonoma de México, CP 04510 Mexico City, Mexico
3
Childhood Nutrition Research Centre Population, Policy and Practice, UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health, London WC1N EH, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(3), 819; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12030819
Received: 17 February 2020 / Revised: 10 March 2020 / Accepted: 13 March 2020 / Published: 19 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Nutrition and Public Health)
Overweight (OW) and obesity (OB) during childhood/adolescence are major public health problems in Mexico. Several obesogenic lifestyle (OL) risk factors have been identified, but the burden and consequences of them in Mexican children/adolescents remain unclear. The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of OL components and describe their relationships with adiposity, and OW/OB. A population-based cross-sectional study of Mexican children/adolescents with nutritional assessment, data collection on daily habits and adiposity as fat-mass index (FMI) by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry was performed. Individual OL-components: “inactivity,” “excessive screen time,” “insufficient sleep,” “unhealthy-diet”, were defined according to non-adherence to previously published healthy recommendations. Results: 1449 subjects were assessed between March 2015 to April 2018. Sixteen percent of subjects had all four OL-components, 40% had three, 35% had two, 9% had one, and 0.5% had none. A cumulative OL score showed a significant dose–response effect with FMI. The combination of inactivity, excessive screen time, and insufficient sleep showed the highest risk association to OW/OB and higher values of FMI. Conclusions: The prevalence of OL-components was extremely high and associated with increased adiposity and OW/OB. Several interventions are needed to revert this major public health threat. View Full-Text
Keywords: children 1; adolescents 2; obesity 3; adiposity 4; lifestyle; body composition children 1; adolescents 2; obesity 3; adiposity 4; lifestyle; body composition
MDPI and ACS Style

Lopez-Gonzalez, D.; Partida-Gaytán, A.; Wells, J.C.; Reyes-Delpech, P.; Avila-Rosano, F.; Ortiz-Obregon, M.; Gomez-Mendoza, F.; Diaz-Escobar, L.; Clark, P. Obesogenic Lifestyle and Its Influence on Adiposity in Children and Adolescents, Evidence from Mexico. Nutrients 2020, 12, 819.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop