Next Article in Journal
Gut Microbiota Dysbiosis in Patients with Biopsy-Proven Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Cross-Sectional Study in Taiwan
Previous Article in Journal
Nutrition and the Immune System: A Complicated Tango
Article

Obesogenic Lifestyle and Its Influence on Adiposity in Children and Adolescents, Evidence from Mexico

1
Clinical Epidemiology Research Unit, Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez, CP 06720 Mexico City, Mexico
2
Universidad Nacional Autonoma de México, CP 04510 Mexico City, Mexico
3
Childhood Nutrition Research Centre Population, Policy and Practice, UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health, London WC1N EH, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(3), 819; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12030819
Received: 17 February 2020 / Revised: 10 March 2020 / Accepted: 13 March 2020 / Published: 19 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Nutrition and Public Health)
Overweight (OW) and obesity (OB) during childhood/adolescence are major public health problems in Mexico. Several obesogenic lifestyle (OL) risk factors have been identified, but the burden and consequences of them in Mexican children/adolescents remain unclear. The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of OL components and describe their relationships with adiposity, and OW/OB. A population-based cross-sectional study of Mexican children/adolescents with nutritional assessment, data collection on daily habits and adiposity as fat-mass index (FMI) by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry was performed. Individual OL-components: “inactivity,” “excessive screen time,” “insufficient sleep,” “unhealthy-diet”, were defined according to non-adherence to previously published healthy recommendations. Results: 1449 subjects were assessed between March 2015 to April 2018. Sixteen percent of subjects had all four OL-components, 40% had three, 35% had two, 9% had one, and 0.5% had none. A cumulative OL score showed a significant dose–response effect with FMI. The combination of inactivity, excessive screen time, and insufficient sleep showed the highest risk association to OW/OB and higher values of FMI. Conclusions: The prevalence of OL-components was extremely high and associated with increased adiposity and OW/OB. Several interventions are needed to revert this major public health threat. View Full-Text
Keywords: children 1; adolescents 2; obesity 3; adiposity 4; lifestyle; body composition children 1; adolescents 2; obesity 3; adiposity 4; lifestyle; body composition
MDPI and ACS Style

Lopez-Gonzalez, D.; Partida-Gaytán, A.; Wells, J.C.; Reyes-Delpech, P.; Avila-Rosano, F.; Ortiz-Obregon, M.; Gomez-Mendoza, F.; Diaz-Escobar, L.; Clark, P. Obesogenic Lifestyle and Its Influence on Adiposity in Children and Adolescents, Evidence from Mexico. Nutrients 2020, 12, 819. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12030819

AMA Style

Lopez-Gonzalez D, Partida-Gaytán A, Wells JC, Reyes-Delpech P, Avila-Rosano F, Ortiz-Obregon M, Gomez-Mendoza F, Diaz-Escobar L, Clark P. Obesogenic Lifestyle and Its Influence on Adiposity in Children and Adolescents, Evidence from Mexico. Nutrients. 2020; 12(3):819. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12030819

Chicago/Turabian Style

Lopez-Gonzalez, Desiree, Armando Partida-Gaytán, Jonathan C. Wells, Pamela Reyes-Delpech, Fatima Avila-Rosano, Marcela Ortiz-Obregon, Frida Gomez-Mendoza, Laura Diaz-Escobar, and Patricia Clark. 2020. "Obesogenic Lifestyle and Its Influence on Adiposity in Children and Adolescents, Evidence from Mexico" Nutrients 12, no. 3: 819. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12030819

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop