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Consumption of Sugar-Sweetened Beverages, Juice, Artificially-Sweetened Soda and Bottled Water: An Australian Population Study

1
School of Public Health, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide 5000, Australia
2
Health Policy Centre, South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute, Adelaide 5000, Australia
3
Centre for Behavioural Research in Cancer, Cancer Council Victoria, Melbourne, Australia, 3004 & School of Psychological Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne 3010, Australia
4
Food Policy, The George Institute for Global Health, Sydney 2042, Australia
5
College of Nursing and Health Sciences, Flinders University, Adelaide 5042, Australia
6
Cancer Epidemiology and Population Health, University of South Australia, Adelaide 5000, Australia
7
Discipline of Medicine, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia, 5000 & Centre for Nutrition and GI Diseases, South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute, Adelaide 5000, Australia
8
Obesity Policy Coalition and Alcohol and Obesity Policy, Cancer Council Victoria, Melbourne 3004, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(3), 817; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12030817
Received: 4 February 2020 / Revised: 6 March 2020 / Accepted: 12 March 2020 / Published: 19 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Nutrition and Public Health)
Reducing consumption of free sugars, such as those found in high concentrations in manufactured products such as sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) and 100% fruit juices, is a global public health priority. This study aimed to measure prevalence of widely available pre-packaged non-alcoholic water-based beverages (carbonated sodas, sports drinks, energy drinks, artificially-sweetened sodas, fruit juices (any type), and bottled water) and to comprehensively examine behavioral, environmental, current health, and demographic correlates of consumption. A cross-sectional, nationally-representative population survey of 3430 Australian adults (18+ years) was conducted using computer-assisted telephone (mobile and landline) interviewing. Past week prevalence of pre-packaged drinks containing free sugar was 47.3%; daily prevalence was 13.6%. Of all the pre-packaged drinks assessed, consumption of fruit juices (any type) was the most prevalent (38.8%), followed by bottled water (37.4%), soda (28.9%), artificially-sweetened soda (18.1%), sports drinks (8.1%), and energy drinks (4.2%). Higher soda consumption was associated with males, younger age, socio-economic disadvantage, frequent takeaway food consumption, availability of soda in the home, obesity, and a diagnosis of heart disease or depression. A diagnosis of Type 2 Diabetes was associated with increased likelihood of consuming artificially-sweetened sodas and decreased likelihood of consuming sugar-sweetened soda. SSB consumption is prevalent in Australia, especially among young adults and males, foreshadowing continued population weight gain and high burdens of chronic disease. To reduce consumption, Australia must take a comprehensive approach, incorporating policy reform, effective community education, and active promotion of water. View Full-Text
Keywords: sugar-sweetened beverages; fruit juice; artificially-sweetened beverages; consumption; national survey sugar-sweetened beverages; fruit juice; artificially-sweetened beverages; consumption; national survey
MDPI and ACS Style

Miller, C.; Ettridge, K.; Wakefield, M.; Pettigrew, S.; Coveney, J.; Roder, D.; Durkin, S.; Wittert, G.; Martin, J.; Dono, J. Consumption of Sugar-Sweetened Beverages, Juice, Artificially-Sweetened Soda and Bottled Water: An Australian Population Study. Nutrients 2020, 12, 817.

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