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Review

Source and Composition in Amino Acid of Dietary Proteins in the Primary Prevention and Treatment of CKD

1
Departement of Nephrology, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Lyon Sud Hospital, 69495 Pierre Bénite, France
2
Phocean Nephrology Institute, Clinique Bouchard, ELSAN, 13000 Marseille, France
3
INSERM, INRA, C2VN, Aix Marseille University, 13000 Marseille, France
4
Association Pour l’Utilisation Du Rein Artificiel A Domicile, 33110 Gradignan, France
5
University Lyon, CarMeN Laboratory, INSA-Lyon, INSERM U1060, INRA, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 69100 Villeurbanne, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(12), 3892; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12123892
Received: 3 November 2020 / Revised: 14 December 2020 / Accepted: 15 December 2020 / Published: 19 December 2020
Nutrition is a cornerstone in the management of chronic kidney disease (CKD). To limit urea generation and accumulation, a global reduction in protein intake is routinely proposed. However, recent evidence has accumulated on the benefits of plant-based diets and plant-derived proteins without a clear understanding of underlying mechanisms. Particularly the roles of some amino acids (AAs) appear to be either deleterious or beneficial on the progression of CKD and its complications. This review outlines recent data on the role of a low protein intake, the plant nature of proteins, and some specific AAs actions on kidney function and metabolic disorders. We will focus on renal hemodynamics, intestinal microbiota, and the production of uremic toxins. Overall, these mechanistic effects are still poorly understood but deserve special attention to understand why low-protein diets provide clinical benefits and to find potential new therapeutic targets in CKD. View Full-Text
Keywords: chronic kidney disease; amino-acids; plant-based diet; low-protein diet chronic kidney disease; amino-acids; plant-based diet; low-protein diet
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MDPI and ACS Style

Letourneau, P.; Bataille, S.; Chauveau, P.; Fouque, D.; Koppe, L. Source and Composition in Amino Acid of Dietary Proteins in the Primary Prevention and Treatment of CKD. Nutrients 2020, 12, 3892. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12123892

AMA Style

Letourneau P, Bataille S, Chauveau P, Fouque D, Koppe L. Source and Composition in Amino Acid of Dietary Proteins in the Primary Prevention and Treatment of CKD. Nutrients. 2020; 12(12):3892. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12123892

Chicago/Turabian Style

Letourneau, Pierre, Stanislas Bataille, Philippe Chauveau, Denis Fouque, and Laetitia Koppe. 2020. "Source and Composition in Amino Acid of Dietary Proteins in the Primary Prevention and Treatment of CKD" Nutrients 12, no. 12: 3892. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12123892

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