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Open AccessArticle

Prospective Evaluation of Mango Fruit Intake on Facial Wrinkles and Erythema in Postmenopausal Women: A Randomized Clinical Pilot Study

1
Department of Nutrition, UC Davis, Davis, CA 95616, USA
2
Department of Internal Medicine, UC Davis, Sacramento, CA 95817, USA
3
Department of Dermatology, UC Davis, Sacramento, CA 95816, USA
4
Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Sacramento, CA 95819, USA
5
Pacific Skin Institute, Sacramento, CA 95815, USA
6
Zen Dermatology, Sacramento, CA 95819, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Nutrients 2020, 12(11), 3381; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12113381
Received: 13 October 2020 / Revised: 27 October 2020 / Accepted: 2 November 2020 / Published: 4 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Phytochemicals and Human Health)
Mangos are rich in β-carotene and other carotenoids, along with several phenolic acids that may provide oxidant defense and photoprotection to the skin. The objectives of this study are to investigate the effects of Ataulfo mango intake on the development of facial wrinkles and erythema. A randomized two-group parallel-arm study was conducted to assess 16 weeks of either 85 g or 250 g of mango intake in healthy postmenopausal women with Fitzpatrick skin type II or III. Facial photographs were captured at weeks 0, 8, and 16, and wrinkles at the lateral canthi and erythema at the cheeks were quantified. Skin carotenoid values were measured with reflection spectroscopy. Deep wrinkle severity decreased significantly in the 85 g group after 8 (p = 0.007) and 16 (p = 0.03) weeks compared to baseline measures. In contrast, those in the 250 g group showed an increase after 16 weeks in average wrinkle severity (p = 0.049), average wrinkle length (p = 0.007), fine wrinkle severity (p = 0.02), and emerging wrinkle severity (p = 0.02). Erythema in the cheeks increased with 85 g of mango intake (p = 0.04). The intake of 85 g of mangos reduced wrinkles in fair-skinned postmenopausal women, while an intake of 250 g showed the opposite effect. Further studies feeding 85 g of mangos are warranted. View Full-Text
Keywords: mango; skin; wrinkles; fruit; carotenoids; polyphenols; postmenopausal; dermatology; photoprotection mango; skin; wrinkles; fruit; carotenoids; polyphenols; postmenopausal; dermatology; photoprotection
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Fam, V.W.; Holt, R.R.; Keen, C.L.; Sivamani, R.K.; Hackman, R.M. Prospective Evaluation of Mango Fruit Intake on Facial Wrinkles and Erythema in Postmenopausal Women: A Randomized Clinical Pilot Study. Nutrients 2020, 12, 3381.

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