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Review

Plant Fortification of the Diet for Anti-Ageing Effects: A Review

1
School of Bioengineering and Biosciences, Lovely Professional University, Phagwara 144411, Punjab, India
2
School of Bioengineering and Food Technology, Shoolini University of Biotechnology and Management Sciences, Solan 173229, Himachal Pradesh, India
3
School of Biological and Environmental Sciences, Shoolini University of Biotechnology and Management Sciences, Solan 173229, Himachal Pradesh, India
4
Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Hradec Kralove, 50003 Hradec Kralove, Czech Republic
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Nutrients 2020, 12(10), 3008; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12103008
Received: 31 August 2020 / Revised: 27 September 2020 / Accepted: 29 September 2020 / Published: 30 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition, Diet Quality, Aging and Frailty)
Ageing is an enigmatic and progressive biological process which undermines the normal functions of living organisms with time. Ageing has been conspicuously linked to dietary habits, whereby dietary restrictions and antioxidants play a substantial role in slowing the ageing process. Oxygen is an essential molecule that sustains human life on earth and is involved in the synthesis of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that pose certain health complications. The ROS are believed to be a significant factor in the progression of ageing. A robust lifestyle and healthy food, containing dietary antioxidants, are essential for improving the overall livelihood and decelerating the ageing process. Dietary antioxidants such as adaptogens, anthocyanins, vitamins A/D/C/E and isoflavones slow the ageing phenomena by reducing ROS production in the cells, thereby improving the life span of living organisms. This review highlights the manifestations of ageing, theories associated with ageing and the importance of diet management in ageing. It also discusses the available functional foods as well as nutraceuticals with anti-ageing potential. View Full-Text
Keywords: anti-ageing; diet; eating habits; functional foods; skin ageing anti-ageing; diet; eating habits; functional foods; skin ageing
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MDPI and ACS Style

Dhanjal, D.S.; Bhardwaj, S.; Sharma, R.; Bhardwaj, K.; Kumar, D.; Chopra, C.; Nepovimova, E.; Singh, R.; Kuca, K. Plant Fortification of the Diet for Anti-Ageing Effects: A Review. Nutrients 2020, 12, 3008. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12103008

AMA Style

Dhanjal DS, Bhardwaj S, Sharma R, Bhardwaj K, Kumar D, Chopra C, Nepovimova E, Singh R, Kuca K. Plant Fortification of the Diet for Anti-Ageing Effects: A Review. Nutrients. 2020; 12(10):3008. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12103008

Chicago/Turabian Style

Dhanjal, Daljeet Singh, Sonali Bhardwaj, Ruchi Sharma, Kanchan Bhardwaj, Dinesh Kumar, Chirag Chopra, Eugenie Nepovimova, Reena Singh, and Kamil Kuca. 2020. "Plant Fortification of the Diet for Anti-Ageing Effects: A Review" Nutrients 12, no. 10: 3008. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12103008

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