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Article

The Mediterranean Diet in the Stroke Belt: A Cross-Sectional Study on Adherence and Perceived Knowledge, Barriers, and Benefits

1
Department of Nutrition, Dietetics, and Hospitality Management, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849, USA
2
Boshell Diabetes and Metabolic Diseases Research Program, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(8), 1847; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11081847
Received: 15 July 2019 / Revised: 31 July 2019 / Accepted: 7 August 2019 / Published: 9 August 2019
The Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) is recommended by the current Dietary Guidelines for Americans, yet little is known about the perceived barriers and benefits to the diet in the U.S., particularly in the Stroke Belt (SB). Thus, the purpose of this study was to examine MedDiet adherence and perceived knowledge, benefits, and barriers to the MedDiet in the U.S. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 1447 participants in the U.S., and responses were sorted into geographic groups: the SB, California (CA), and all other US states (OtherUS). Linear models and multivariable linear regression analysis was used for data analysis. Convenience, sensory factors, and health were greater barriers to the MedDiet in the SB group, but not the OtherUS group (p < 0.05). Weight loss was considered a benefit of the MedDiet in the SB (p < 0.05), while price and familiarity were found to be less of a benefit (p < 0.05). Respondents with a bachelor’s degree or greater education had greater total MEDAS scores (p < 0.05) and obese participants had a lower MedDiet adherence score (p < 0.05). Our results identify key barriers and benefits of the MedDiet in the SB which can inform targeted MedDiet intervention studies. View Full-Text
Keywords: Mediterranean diet; adherence; barriers and benefits; Stroke Belt; stages of change Mediterranean diet; adherence; barriers and benefits; Stroke Belt; stages of change
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MDPI and ACS Style

Knight, C.J.; Jackson, O.; Rahman, I.; Burnett, D.O.; Frugé, A.D.; Greene, M.W. The Mediterranean Diet in the Stroke Belt: A Cross-Sectional Study on Adherence and Perceived Knowledge, Barriers, and Benefits. Nutrients 2019, 11, 1847. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11081847

AMA Style

Knight CJ, Jackson O, Rahman I, Burnett DO, Frugé AD, Greene MW. The Mediterranean Diet in the Stroke Belt: A Cross-Sectional Study on Adherence and Perceived Knowledge, Barriers, and Benefits. Nutrients. 2019; 11(8):1847. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11081847

Chicago/Turabian Style

Knight, Caroline J., Olivia Jackson, Imran Rahman, Donna O. Burnett, Andrew D. Frugé, and Michael W. Greene. 2019. "The Mediterranean Diet in the Stroke Belt: A Cross-Sectional Study on Adherence and Perceived Knowledge, Barriers, and Benefits" Nutrients 11, no. 8: 1847. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11081847

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