Next Article in Journal
Abscisic Acid Standardized Fig (Ficus carica) Extracts Ameliorate Postprandial Glycemic and Insulinemic Responses in Healthy Adults
Next Article in Special Issue
Association of Sleep Duration and Insomnia Symptoms with Components of Metabolic Syndrome and Inflammation in Middle-Aged and Older Adults with Metabolic Syndrome in Taiwan
Previous Article in Journal
The Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome and Its Related Risk Complications among Koreans
Previous Article in Special Issue
Sleep Quality and the Mediating Role of Stress Management on Eating by Nursing Personnel
Open AccessArticle

Social Jet Lag Associates Negatively with the Adherence to the Mediterranean Diet and Body Mass Index among Young Adults

1
Department of Nutrition, Food Science and Gastronomy, School of Pharmacy and Food Science, University of Barcelona, 08028 Barcelona, Spain
2
INSA-UB, Nutrition and Food Safety Research Institute, University of Barcelona, 08921 Santa Coloma de Gramenet, Spain
3
Department of Biochemistry and Physiology, School of Pharmacy and Food Science, University of Barcelona, 08028 Barcelona, Spain
4
CIBER Physiopathology of Obesity and Nutrition (CIBEROBN), Institute of Health Carlos III, 28029 Madrid, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Dr Cambras and Dr Izquierdo-Pulido share senior authorship.
Nutrients 2019, 11(8), 1756; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11081756
Received: 1 July 2019 / Revised: 27 July 2019 / Accepted: 29 July 2019 / Published: 30 July 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sleep, Nutrition, and Human Health)
Obesity and unhealthy eating habits have been associated with irregular sleep–wake patterns during the week, also known as social jet lag. The Mediterranean diet is a healthy pattern related with a better health and sleep quality. However, potential associations with social jet lag remain unexplored. The aim of this study was to examine whether higher social jet lag is linked to lower adherence to the Mediterranean diet and whether it is associated with BMI (Body Mass Index). This cross-sectional study included 534 young adults (18–25 years). Anthropometric parameters, adherence to the Mediterranean diet, chronotype and social jet lag were studied. Our results revealed that individuals with greater social jet lag showed lower adherence to the Mediterranean diet and had a higher BMI. Among the habits that characterized the Mediterranean dietary pattern, we observed that higher social jet lag was significantly associated with a lower intake of fruits and vegetables, as well as skipping breakfast. Hence, the promotion of regular sleep habits together with healthy dietary patterns should be considered for obesity prevention, especially among young adults. View Full-Text
Keywords: social jet lag; BMI; Mediterranean diet; chronotype; young adults social jet lag; BMI; Mediterranean diet; chronotype; young adults
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

MDPI and ACS Style

Zerón-Rugerio, M.F.; Cambras, T.; Izquierdo-Pulido, M. Social Jet Lag Associates Negatively with the Adherence to the Mediterranean Diet and Body Mass Index among Young Adults. Nutrients 2019, 11, 1756.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map

1
Back to TopTop