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Changes in Nutritional Status and Musculoskeletal Health in a Geriatric Post-Fall Care Plan Setting

1
Australian Institute for Musculoskeletal Science (AIMSS), The University of Melbourne and Western Health, St. Albans, Victoria 3021, Australia
2
Department of Medicine—Western Health, Melbourne Medical School, The University of Melbourne, St. Albans, Victoria 3021, Australia
3
Institute of Epidemiology, Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Center for Environmental Health (GmbH), 85764 Neuherberg, Germany
4
Department of Physiotherapy, Londrina State University (UEL) and University North of Paraná (UNOPAR), Londrina, Paraná 86041-120, Brazil
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(7), 1551; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11071551
Received: 25 May 2019 / Revised: 4 July 2019 / Accepted: 5 July 2019 / Published: 9 July 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ageing and Nutrition through Lifespan)
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Abstract

Understanding how changes in nutritional status influence musculoskeletal recovery after falling remains unclear. We explored associations between changes in nutritional status and musculoskeletal health in 106 community-dwelling older adults aged ≥65 years, who attended the Falls and Fractures Clinic at Sunshine Hospital in St Albans, Australia after falling. At baseline and after 6 months, individuals were assessed for Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA®), grip strength, gait speed, Timed Up and Go (TUG) test, Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB), and bone turnover marker levels. Associations were examined using multiple linear regression, adjusted for baseline covariates and post-fall care plans. Over 6 months, the prevalence of malnutrition or risk thereof decreased from 29% to 15% using MNA <24/30. Specifically, 20 individuals (19%) improved, 7 (7%) deteriorated, and 73 (69%) maintained nutritional status, including 65 (61%) who remained well-nourished and 8 (8%) who remained malnourished/at risk. A 1-point increase in MNA score over 6 months was associated with an increase of 0.20 points (95% confidence interval 0.10, 0.31, p < 0.001) in SPPB score. Improvement in nutritional status was associated with improvement in physical performance, providing a basis for interventional studies to ascertain causality and evaluate nutritional models of care for post-fall functional recovery in older adults. View Full-Text
Keywords: malnutrition; MNA; nutrition; physical performance; bone turnover; sarcopenia; osteosarcopenia; falls; elderly; prospective malnutrition; MNA; nutrition; physical performance; bone turnover; sarcopenia; osteosarcopenia; falls; elderly; prospective
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).

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Conzade, R.; Phu, S.; Vogrin, S.; Bani Hassan, E.; Sepúlveda-Loyola, W.; Thorand, B.; Duque, G. Changes in Nutritional Status and Musculoskeletal Health in a Geriatric Post-Fall Care Plan Setting. Nutrients 2019, 11, 1551.

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