Next Article in Journal
Towards a Food Pharmacy: Immunologic Modulation through Diet
Next Article in Special Issue
Consumer Understanding and Culinary Use of Legumes in Australia
Previous Article in Journal
Opportunities and Challenges Arising from Holiday Clubs Tackling Children’s Hunger in the UK: Pilot Club Leader Perspectives
Previous Article in Special Issue
Consumption of Animal-Source Protein is Associated with Improved Height-for-Age z Scores in Rural Malawian Children Aged 12–36 Months
Review

Mung Bean (Vigna radiata L.): Bioactive Polyphenols, Polysaccharides, Peptides, and Health Benefits

1
Key Laboratory of Plant Protein and Grain Processing, National Engineering and Technology Research Center for Fruits and Vegetables, College of Food Science and Nutritional Engineering, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083, China
2
Institute of Economic Crops, Shanxi Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Fenyang 032200, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(6), 1238; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11061238
Received: 8 May 2019 / Revised: 25 May 2019 / Accepted: 28 May 2019 / Published: 31 May 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Bean Consumption and Human Health)
Mung bean (Vigna radiata L.) is an important pulse consumed all over the world, especially in Asian countries, and has a long history of usage as traditional medicine. It has been known to be an excellent source of protein, dietary fiber, minerals, vitamins, and significant amounts of bioactive compounds, including polyphenols, polysaccharides, and peptides, therefore, becoming a popular functional food in promoting good health. The mung bean has been documented to ameliorate hyperglycemia, hyperlipemia, and hypertension, and prevent cancer and melanogenesis, as well as possess hepatoprotective and immunomodulatory activities. These health benefits derive primarily from the concentration and properties of those active compounds present in the mung bean. Vitexin and isovitexin are identified as the major polyphenols, and peptides containing hydrophobic amino acid residues with small molecular weight show higher bioactivity in the mung bean. Considering the recent surge in interest in the use of grain legumes, we hope this review will provide a blueprint to better utilize the mung bean in food products to improve human nutrition and further encourage advancement in this field. View Full-Text
Keywords: mung bean; bioactive compounds; polyphenols; polysaccharides; peptides; health benefits mung bean; bioactive compounds; polyphenols; polysaccharides; peptides; health benefits
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

MDPI and ACS Style

Hou, D.; Yousaf, L.; Xue, Y.; Hu, J.; Wu, J.; Hu, X.; Feng, N.; Shen, Q. Mung Bean (Vigna radiata L.): Bioactive Polyphenols, Polysaccharides, Peptides, and Health Benefits. Nutrients 2019, 11, 1238. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11061238

AMA Style

Hou D, Yousaf L, Xue Y, Hu J, Wu J, Hu X, Feng N, Shen Q. Mung Bean (Vigna radiata L.): Bioactive Polyphenols, Polysaccharides, Peptides, and Health Benefits. Nutrients. 2019; 11(6):1238. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11061238

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hou, Dianzhi, Laraib Yousaf, Yong Xue, Jinrong Hu, Jihong Wu, Xiaosong Hu, Naihong Feng, and Qun Shen. 2019. "Mung Bean (Vigna radiata L.): Bioactive Polyphenols, Polysaccharides, Peptides, and Health Benefits" Nutrients 11, no. 6: 1238. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11061238

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop