Next Article in Journal
Multidisciplinary Integrated Metabolic Rehabilitation in Elderly Obese Patients: Effects on Cardiovascular Risk Factors, Fatigue and Muscle Performance
Next Article in Special Issue
Chemopreventive Effects of Strawberry and Black Raspberry on Colorectal Cancer in Inflammatory Bowel Disease
Previous Article in Journal
Mung Bean (Vigna radiata L.): Bioactive Polyphenols, Polysaccharides, Peptides, and Health Benefits
Previous Article in Special Issue
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases and Food Additives: To Add Fuel on the Flames!
Open AccessReview

Towards a Food Pharmacy: Immunologic Modulation through Diet

1
Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Leiden University Medical Center, 2313 ZA Leiden, The Netherlands
2
Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Haaglanden Medical Center, 2512 VA The Hague, The Netherlands
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(6), 1239; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11061239
Received: 22 April 2019 / Revised: 24 May 2019 / Accepted: 27 May 2019 / Published: 31 May 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition in Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD))
Patients frequently wonder whether their dietary pattern influences the course of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Many patients even avoid certain foods that aggravate their symptoms. Although interest in nutritional interventions is rising among physicians, the current application of nutritional interventions in the IBD population is limited due to the lack of scientific evidence from clinical trials. Several studies, however, have identified associations between diet, gut microbiota, intestinal epithelial integrity, and mucosal immune responses. In patients consuming predominantly a Western diet high in n-6 poly-unsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), sugars, and meat, and low in fruits and vegetables, an impaired gut epithelial barrier and disturbances in the intestinal microbiota have been observed, resulting in a chronic mucosal inflammation. An anti-inflammatory diet may restore this disbalance. In this review, we discuss the effects of diet on the composition of the microbiota, the gut epithelial barrier function, and the mucosal immune system. View Full-Text
Keywords: inflammatory bowel disease; dietary modification; exclusive enteral nutrition; lifestyle modification; Mediterranean diet inflammatory bowel disease; dietary modification; exclusive enteral nutrition; lifestyle modification; Mediterranean diet
MDPI and ACS Style

Molendijk, I.; van der Marel, S.; Maljaars, P.J. Towards a Food Pharmacy: Immunologic Modulation through Diet. Nutrients 2019, 11, 1239.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop