Next Article in Journal
The Role of Probiotics and Prebiotics in the Prevention and Treatment of Obesity
Next Article in Special Issue
Serum Lutein is related to Relational Memory Performance
Previous Article in Journal
Acute Effects of Three Cooked Non-Cereal Starchy Foods on Postprandial Glycemic Responses and in Vitro Carbohydrate Digestion in Comparison with Whole Grains: A Randomized Trial
Previous Article in Special Issue
β-Cryptoxanthin Reduces Body Fat and Increases Oxidative Stress Response in Caenorhabditis elegans Model
Review

Can Lycopene Impact the Androgen Axis in Prostate Cancer?: A Systematic Review of Cell Culture and Animal Studies

1
Division of Nutritional Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA
2
Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(3), 633; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11030633
Received: 6 February 2019 / Revised: 8 March 2019 / Accepted: 11 March 2019 / Published: 15 March 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carotenoids and Human Health)
First-line therapy for advanced or metastatic prostate cancer (PCa) involves the removal of tumor-promoting androgens by androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), resulting in transient tumor regression. Recurrent disease is attributed to tumor adaptation to survive, despite lower circulating androgen concentrations, making the blockage of downstream androgen signaling a chemotherapeutic goal for PCa. Dietary intake of tomato and its predominant carotenoid, lycopene, reduce the risk for PCa, and preclinical studies have shown promising results that tomato and lycopene can inhibit androgen signaling in normal prostate tissue. The goal of this systematic review was to evaluate whether mechanistic evidence exists to support the hypothesis that tomato or lycopene interact with the androgen axis in PCa. Eighteen studies (n = 5 in vivo; n = 13 in vitro) were included in the final review. A formal meta-analysis was not feasible due to variability of the data; however, the overall estimated directions of effect for the compared studies were visually represented by albatross plots. All studies demonstrated either null or, more commonly, inhibitory effects of tomato or lycopene treatment on androgen-related outcomes. Strong mechanistic evidence was unable to be ascertained, but tomato and lycopene treatment appears to down-regulate androgen metabolism and signaling in PCa. View Full-Text
Keywords: prostate cancer; tomato; lycopene; androgen; cell culture; animal prostate cancer; tomato; lycopene; androgen; cell culture; animal
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Applegate, C.C.; Rowles, J.L., III; Erdman, J.W., Jr. Can Lycopene Impact the Androgen Axis in Prostate Cancer?: A Systematic Review of Cell Culture and Animal Studies. Nutrients 2019, 11, 633. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11030633

AMA Style

Applegate CC, Rowles JL III, Erdman JW Jr.. Can Lycopene Impact the Androgen Axis in Prostate Cancer?: A Systematic Review of Cell Culture and Animal Studies. Nutrients. 2019; 11(3):633. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11030633

Chicago/Turabian Style

Applegate, Catherine C., Joe L. Rowles III, and John W. Erdman Jr. 2019. "Can Lycopene Impact the Androgen Axis in Prostate Cancer?: A Systematic Review of Cell Culture and Animal Studies" Nutrients 11, no. 3: 633. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11030633

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop