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Acute Effects of Three Cooked Non-Cereal Starchy Foods on Postprandial Glycemic Responses and in Vitro Carbohydrate Digestion in Comparison with Whole Grains: A Randomized Trial

1
Beijing Advanced Innovation Centre for Food Nutrition and Human Health, College of Food Science & Nutritional Engineering, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083, China
2
College of Biological Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100094, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(3), 634; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11030634
Received: 7 February 2019 / Revised: 6 March 2019 / Accepted: 12 March 2019 / Published: 15 March 2019
Plant origin, processing, and domestic preparation may affect the postprandial glycemic response (PGR) of starchy foods. The objective of this study was to examine the possibility of integrating domestically cooked non-cereal starchy foods commonly consumed in Northeast Asia into glycemic management diet, and compare their glycemic characteristics with those of waxy and non-waxy whole grains and starchy beans. In a randomized crossover trial, ten healthy subjects consumed dried lily bulb (LB), lotus seed (LS), adlay (AD), waxy black rice (BR), millet (MI), and adzuki bean (AB), pre-soaked and each cooked for two time durations. Acute PGR tests and in vitro carbohydrate digestion were carried out for each test food. Both the LS and AB meals achieved low glycemic index (GI 21–51), while the other starchy foods failed to show significant difference with rice (GI 83–109). The hydrolysis indexes of LS and AB were 37.7%–61.1%, significantly lower than other test foods. The in vitro tests indicated that pre-soaking resulted in high rapidly digestible starch (RDS) and low resistant starch (RS). Careful choice of whole grain materials, minimized pre-soaking, and moderate cooking may be critical factors for successful postprandial glycemic management for diabetic and pre-diabetic. View Full-Text
Keywords: lotus seed; adzuki bean; starchy food; glycemic response; in vitro carbohydrate digestion lotus seed; adzuki bean; starchy food; glycemic response; in vitro carbohydrate digestion
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MDPI and ACS Style

Zhu, R.; Fan, Z.; Han, Y.; Li, S.; Li, G.; Wang, L.; Ye, T.; Zhao, W. Acute Effects of Three Cooked Non-Cereal Starchy Foods on Postprandial Glycemic Responses and in Vitro Carbohydrate Digestion in Comparison with Whole Grains: A Randomized Trial. Nutrients 2019, 11, 634. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11030634

AMA Style

Zhu R, Fan Z, Han Y, Li S, Li G, Wang L, Ye T, Zhao W. Acute Effects of Three Cooked Non-Cereal Starchy Foods on Postprandial Glycemic Responses and in Vitro Carbohydrate Digestion in Comparison with Whole Grains: A Randomized Trial. Nutrients. 2019; 11(3):634. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11030634

Chicago/Turabian Style

Zhu, Ruixin, Zhihong Fan, Yue Han, Shuang Li, Guojing Li, Linlin Wang, Ting Ye, and Wenqi Zhao. 2019. "Acute Effects of Three Cooked Non-Cereal Starchy Foods on Postprandial Glycemic Responses and in Vitro Carbohydrate Digestion in Comparison with Whole Grains: A Randomized Trial" Nutrients 11, no. 3: 634. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11030634

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