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Article

Calcium Intake in Children with Eczema and/or Food Allergy: A Prospective Cohort Study

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Max Rady College of Medicine, The University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB R3E 0W2, Canada
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Department of Pediatrics and Child Health, The University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB R3E 0W2, Canada
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The Children’s Health Research Institute of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB R3E 3P4, Canada
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Department of Pediatrics, The University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 1C9, Canada
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George and Fay Yee Centre for Healthcare Innovation, Winnipeg, MB R3E 0T6, Canada
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Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(12), 3039; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11123039
Received: 30 October 2019 / Revised: 4 December 2019 / Accepted: 6 December 2019 / Published: 12 December 2019
Eczema and food allergy may impact diet. Using data from a cohort of Manitoba children born in 1995, we examined calcium intake, defined as the frequency and quality of calcium products consumed (with the exception of cheese), amongst Manitoba adolescents (12–14 years) with eczema or food allergy in childhood (7–8 years) or adolescence. At both ages, children were assessed by a physician for eczema and food allergy. Adolescents completed food frequency questionnaires. Calcium intake was defined as 1+ vs. <1 weekly. Linear and logistic regression was used as appropriate, with adjustments for confounders. Overall, 468 adolescents were included, of whom 62 (13.3%) had eczema only in childhood, 25 (5.3%) had food allergy only, and 26 (5.6%) had eczema and food allergy. Compared to children without eczema, those with eczema only had poorer calcium intake in adolescence (β −0.44; 95%CI −0.96; 0.00). Girls, but not boys, with eczema in childhood had poorer calcium intake in adolescence than girls without eczema (β −0.84; 95%CI −1.60; −0.08). These patterns persisted even if children experienced transient vs. persistent eczema to adolescence. Similar but non-significant trends were found for food allergy. Childhood eczema is associated with significantly lower calcium intake and consumption in adolescence. These differences persist to adolescence, even if a child “outgrows” their allergic condition. View Full-Text
Keywords: adolescents; calcium; dairy; food allergy adolescents; calcium; dairy; food allergy
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MDPI and ACS Style

Hildebrand, H.; Simons, E.; Kozyrskyj, A.L.; Becker, A.B.; Protudjer, J.L.P. Calcium Intake in Children with Eczema and/or Food Allergy: A Prospective Cohort Study. Nutrients 2019, 11, 3039. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11123039

AMA Style

Hildebrand H, Simons E, Kozyrskyj AL, Becker AB, Protudjer JLP. Calcium Intake in Children with Eczema and/or Food Allergy: A Prospective Cohort Study. Nutrients. 2019; 11(12):3039. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11123039

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hildebrand, Hailey, Elinor Simons, Anita L. Kozyrskyj, Allan B. Becker, and Jennifer L.P. Protudjer. 2019. "Calcium Intake in Children with Eczema and/or Food Allergy: A Prospective Cohort Study" Nutrients 11, no. 12: 3039. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11123039

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