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Open AccessArticle

Dietary and Physical Activity Behaviors in Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome per the New International Evidence-Based Guideline

1
Department of Preventative Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60611, USA
2
Division of Nutritional Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA
3
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY 14623, USA
4
Ronald O. Perelman and Claudia Cohen Center for Reproductive Medicine, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, NY 10065, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
A.W.L. and M.K. contributed equally to this work and should be regarded as equal first authors.
Nutrients 2019, 11(11), 2711; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11112711
Received: 7 October 2019 / Revised: 2 November 2019 / Accepted: 6 November 2019 / Published: 8 November 2019
Lifestyle modifications are recommended as first-line therapy in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). However, usual dietary and physical activity (PA) behaviors of women with PCOS remain uncertain, likely owing to controversy in diagnostic criteria. Our objective was to contrast the usual dietary and PA behaviors of women with PCOS (n = 80) diagnosed by the 2018 International Evidence-based Guideline for the Assessment and Management of PCOS to that of controls (n = 44). Study outcomes were dietary intake, diet quality (Healthy Eating Index-2015), and PA (questionnaire, waist-worn accelerometers). Women with PCOS met the acceptable macronutrient distribution ranges for carbohydrate, fat, and protein, but did not meet the recommended dietary reference intakes for vitamin D (mean (95% confidence interval); 6 (5–7) μg/d), vitamin B9 (275 (252–298) μg/d), total fiber (24 (22–26) g/d), or sodium (4.0 (3.6–4.4) g/d). Women with PCOS also met the US recommendations for PA. No differences were detected in dietary intake, diet quality, or PA levels between groups (p ≥ 0.11). In conclusion, women with and without PCOS have comparable dietary and PA behaviors. A lack of unique targets for dietary or PA interventions supports the position of the new guideline to foster healthy lifestyle recommendations for the management of PCOS. View Full-Text
Keywords: diet; exercise; polycystic ovary syndrome; healthy lifestyle; nutritional assessment diet; exercise; polycystic ovary syndrome; healthy lifestyle; nutritional assessment
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Lin, A.W.; Kazemi, M.; Jarrett, B.Y.; Vanden Brink, H.; Hoeger, K.M.; Spandorfer, S.D.; Lujan, M.E. Dietary and Physical Activity Behaviors in Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome per the New International Evidence-Based Guideline. Nutrients 2019, 11, 2711.

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