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Open AccessArticle

Improving the Health Benefits of Snap Bean: Genome-Wide Association Studies of Total Phenolic Content

1
Department of Horticulture, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331, USA
2
Department of Horticulture, University of Wisconsin at Madison, Madison, WI 53706, USA
3
Plant Resilience Institute, Department of Plant Biology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA
4
Department of Plant Science, Delaware Valley University, Doylestown, PA 18901, USA
5
RNA Therapeutics Institute, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA 01605, USA
6
Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA
7
Department of Soil and Crop Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA
8
Department of Plant Science, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND 58105, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(10), 2509; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11102509
Received: 22 August 2019 / Revised: 4 October 2019 / Accepted: 5 October 2019 / Published: 18 October 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Bean Consumption and Human Health)
Snap beans are a significant source of micronutrients in the human diet. Among the micronutrients present in snap beans are phenolic compounds with known beneficial effects on human health, potentially via their metabolism by the gut-associated microbiome. The genetic pathways leading to the production of phenolics in snap bean pods remain uncertain. In this study, we quantified the level of total phenolic content (TPC) in the Bean Coordinated Agriculture Program (CAP) snap bean diversity panel of 149 accessions. The panel was characterized spectrophotometrically for phenolic content with a Folin–Ciocalteu colorimetric assay. Flower, seed and pod color were also quantified, as red, purple, yellow and brown colors are associated with anthocyanins and flavonols in common bean. Genotyping was performed through an Illumina Infinium Genechip BARCBEAN6K_3 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array. Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS) analysis identified 11 quantitative trait nucleotides (QTN) associated with TPC. An SNP was identified for TPC on Pv07 located near the P gene, which is a major switch in the flavonoid biosynthetic pathway. Candidate genes were identified for seven of the 11 TPC QTN. Five regulatory genes were identified and represent novel sources of variation for exploitation in developing snap beans with higher phenolic levels for greater health benefits to the consumer. View Full-Text
Keywords: common bean; Phaseolus vulgaris; flavonoids; association mapping; total phenolic compounds; genome wide association mapping common bean; Phaseolus vulgaris; flavonoids; association mapping; total phenolic compounds; genome wide association mapping
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MDPI and ACS Style

Myers, J.R.; Wallace, L.T.; Mafi Moghaddam, S.; Kleintop, A.E.; Echeverria, D.; Thompson, H.J.; Brick, M.A.; Lee, R.; McClean, P.E. Improving the Health Benefits of Snap Bean: Genome-Wide Association Studies of Total Phenolic Content. Nutrients 2019, 11, 2509. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11102509

AMA Style

Myers JR, Wallace LT, Mafi Moghaddam S, Kleintop AE, Echeverria D, Thompson HJ, Brick MA, Lee R, McClean PE. Improving the Health Benefits of Snap Bean: Genome-Wide Association Studies of Total Phenolic Content. Nutrients. 2019; 11(10):2509. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11102509

Chicago/Turabian Style

Myers, James R.; Wallace, Lyle T.; Mafi Moghaddam, Samira; Kleintop, Adrienne E.; Echeverria, Dimas; Thompson, Henry J.; Brick, Mark A.; Lee, Rian; McClean, Phillip E. 2019. "Improving the Health Benefits of Snap Bean: Genome-Wide Association Studies of Total Phenolic Content" Nutrients 11, no. 10: 2509. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11102509

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