Next Article in Journal
Inflammation and Oxidative Stress in an Obese State and the Protective Effects of Gallic Acid
Next Article in Special Issue
Gut Mucosal Proteins and Bacteriome Are Shaped by the Saturation Index of Dietary Lipids
Previous Article in Journal
Extract from Aronia melanocarpa L. Berries Prevents Cadmium-Induced Oxidative Stress in the Liver: A Study in A Rat Model of Low-Level and Moderate Lifetime Human Exposure to this Toxic Metal
Previous Article in Special Issue
Impact of a Healthy Dietary Pattern on Gut Microbiota and Systemic Inflammation in Humans
Article Menu
Issue 1 (January) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessReview

A Review on Gut Remediation of Selected Environmental Contaminants: Possible Roles of Probiotics and Gut Microbiota

1,2,†, 1,2,†, 2, 2, 1,2 and 1,2,*
1
Gansu Key Laboratory of Biomonitoring and Bioremediation for Environmental Pollution, School of Life Science, Lanzhou University, Tianshuinanlu #222, Lanzhou 730000, Gansu, China
2
Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Cell Activities and Stress Adaptations, School of Life Science, Lanzhou University, Tianshuinanlu #222, Lanzhou 730000, Gansu, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Nutrients 2019, 11(1), 22; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11010022
Received: 6 November 2018 / Revised: 9 December 2018 / Accepted: 17 December 2018 / Published: 21 December 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diet as Means for studying gut-related Inflammation)
  |  
PDF [1051 KB, uploaded 21 December 2018]
  |  

Abstract

Various environmental contaminants including heavy metals, pesticides and antibiotics can contaminate food and water, leading to adverse effects on human health, such as inflammation, oxidative stress and intestinal disorder. Therefore, remediation of the toxicity of foodborne contaminants in human has become a primary concern. Some probiotic bacteria, mainly Lactobacilli, have received a great attention due to their ability to reduce the toxicity of several contaminants. For instance, Lactobacilli can reduce the accumulation and toxicity of selective heavy metals and pesticides in animal tissues by inhibiting intestinal absorption of contaminants and enhancing intestinal barrier function. Probiotics have also shown to decrease the risk of antibiotic-associated diarrhea possibly via competing and producing antagonistic compounds against pathogenic bacteria. Furthermore, probiotics can improve immune function by enhancing the gut microbiota mediated anti-inflammation. Thus, these probiotic bacteria are promising candidates for protecting body against foodborne contaminants-induced toxicity. Study on the mechanism of these beneficial bacterial strains during remediation processes and particularly their interaction with host gut microbiota is an active field of research. This review summarizes the current understanding of the remediation mechanisms of some probiotics and the combined effects of probiotics and gut microbiota on remediation of foodborne contaminants in vivo. View Full-Text
Keywords: environmental contaminants; remediation; probiotics; gut microbiota; foodborne environmental contaminants; remediation; probiotics; gut microbiota; foodborne
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Feng, P.; Ye, Z.; Kakade, A.; Virk, A.K.; Li, X.; Liu, P. A Review on Gut Remediation of Selected Environmental Contaminants: Possible Roles of Probiotics and Gut Microbiota. Nutrients 2019, 11, 22.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Nutrients EISSN 2072-6643 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top