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Open AccessArticle

Increased Adiposity as a Potential Risk Factor for Lower Academic Performance: A Cross-Sectional Study in Chilean Adolescents from Low-to-Middle Socioeconomic Background

1
Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology, University of Chile, Santiago 7830490, Chile
2
Division of Child Development and Community Health, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2018, 10(9), 1133; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10091133
Received: 11 July 2018 / Revised: 8 August 2018 / Accepted: 16 August 2018 / Published: 21 August 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition and Vulnerable Groups)
We explored the association between excess body fat and academic performance in high school students from Santiago, Chile. In 632 16-year-olds (51% males) from low-to-middle socioeconomic status (SES), height, weight, and waist circumference were measured. Body-mass index (BMI) and BMI for age and sex were calculated. Weight status was evaluated with 2007 World Health Organization (WHO) references. Abdominal obesity was diagnosed with International Diabetes Federation (IDF) references. Total fat mass (TFM) was measured with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). TFM values ≥25% in males and ≥35% in females were considered high adiposity. School grades were obtained from administrative records. Analysis of covariance examined the association of fatness measures with academic performance, accounting for the effect of diet and physical activity, and controlling SES background and educational confounders. We found that: (1) having obesity, abdominal obesity, or high adiposity was associated with lower school performance alone or in combination with unhealthy dietary habits or reduced time allocation for exercise; (2) high adiposity and abdominal obesity were more clearly related with lower school grades compared to obesity; (3) the association of increased fatness with lower school grades was more salient in males compared to females. View Full-Text
Keywords: adiposity markers; obesity; fat mass; abdominal obesity; adolescent health; school performance adiposity markers; obesity; fat mass; abdominal obesity; adolescent health; school performance
MDPI and ACS Style

Correa-Burrows, P.; Rodriguez, Y.; Blanco, E.; Gahagan, S.; Burrows, R. Increased Adiposity as a Potential Risk Factor for Lower Academic Performance: A Cross-Sectional Study in Chilean Adolescents from Low-to-Middle Socioeconomic Background. Nutrients 2018, 10, 1133.

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