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Nutrients 2018, 10(7), 876; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10070876

Vitamin D Content of Australian Native Food Plants and Australian-Grown Edible Seaweed

1
School of Public Health, Curtin University, Bentley WA 6102, Australia
2
National Measurement Institute, 1/153 Bertie Street, Port Melbourne VIC 3207, Australia
3
National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health, Research School of Population Health, The Australian National University, Canberra ACT 2600, Australia
4
Centre for Ophthalmology and Visual Science, University of Western Australia, Perth WA 6009, Australia
5
School of Veterinary and Life Sciences, Murdoch University, Murdoch WA 6150, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 24 May 2018 / Revised: 25 June 2018 / Accepted: 3 July 2018 / Published: 6 July 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Changing Times for Vitamin D and Health)
Full-Text   |   PDF [253 KB, uploaded 6 July 2018]

Abstract

Vitamin D has previously been quantified in some plants and algae, particularly in leaves of the Solanaceae family. We measured the vitamin D content of Australian native food plants and Australian-grown edible seaweed. Using liquid chromatography with triple quadrupole mass spectrometry, 13 samples (including leaf, fruit, and seed) were analyzed in duplicate for vitamin D2, vitamin D3, 25-hydroxyvitamin D2, and 25-hydroxyvitamin D3. Five samples contained vitamin D2: raw wattleseed (Acacia victoriae) (0.03 µg/100 g dry weight (DW)); fresh and dried lemon myrtle (Backhousia citriodora) leaves (0.03 and 0.24 µg/100 g DW, respectively); and dried leaves and berries of Tasmanian mountain pepper (Tasmannia lanceolata) (0.67 and 0.05 µg/100 g DW, respectively). Fresh kombu (Lessonia corrugata) contained vitamin D3 (0.01 µg/100 g DW). Detected amounts were low; however, it is possible that exposure to ultraviolet radiation may increase the vitamin D content of plants and algae if vitamin D precursors are present. View Full-Text
Keywords: liquid chromatography with triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (LC-QQQ); liquid chromatography; triple quadrupole; vitamin D; serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D); plants; algae liquid chromatography with triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (LC-QQQ); liquid chromatography; triple quadrupole; vitamin D; serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D); plants; algae
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).

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Hughes, L.J.; Black, L.J.; Sherriff, J.L.; Dunlop, E.; Strobel, N.; Lucas, R.M.; Bornman, J.F. Vitamin D Content of Australian Native Food Plants and Australian-Grown Edible Seaweed. Nutrients 2018, 10, 876.

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