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Psychiatric Comorbidity in Children and Adults with Gluten-Related Disorders: A Narrative Review

1
Division of Neurology, The Hospital for Sick Children, The Peter Gilgan Centre for Research and Learning, 686 Bay St., Toronto, ON M5G 0A4, Canada
2
Instituto de Neurociencias, Universidad de Granada, Avenida del Conocimiento s/n, 18100 Armilla, Granada, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2018, 10(7), 875; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10070875
Received: 7 June 2018 / Revised: 26 June 2018 / Accepted: 4 July 2018 / Published: 6 July 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Extraintestinal Manifestations of Coeliac Disease)
Gluten-related disorders are characterized by both intestinal and extraintestinal manifestations. Previous studies have suggested an association between gluten-related disorder and psychiatric comorbidities. The objective of our current review is to provide a comprehensive review of this association in children and adults. A systematic literature search using MEDLINE, Embase and PsycINFO from inception to 2018 using terms of ‘celiac disease’ or ‘gluten-sensitivity-related disorders’ combined with terms of ‘mental disorders’ was conducted. A total of 47 articles were included in our review, of which 28 studies were conducted in adults, 11 studies in children and eight studies included both children and adults. The majority of studies were conducted in celiac disease, two studies in non-celiac gluten sensitivity and none in wheat allergy. Enough evidence is currently available supporting the association of celiac disease with depression and, to a lesser extent, with eating disorders. Further investigation is warranted to evaluate the association suggested with other psychiatric disorders. In conclusion, routine surveillance of potential psychiatric manifestations in children and adults with gluten-related disorders should be carried out by the attending physician. View Full-Text
Keywords: celiac disease; non-celiac gluten sensitivity; psychiatric disorders; depression; anxiety disorders; eating disorders; ADHD; autism; psychosis celiac disease; non-celiac gluten sensitivity; psychiatric disorders; depression; anxiety disorders; eating disorders; ADHD; autism; psychosis
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MDPI and ACS Style

Slim, M.; Rico-Villademoros, F.; Calandre, E.P. Psychiatric Comorbidity in Children and Adults with Gluten-Related Disorders: A Narrative Review. Nutrients 2018, 10, 875.

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