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Iodine Deficiency in a Study Population of Norwegian Pregnant Women—Results from the Little in Norway Study (LiN)

1
Institute of Marine Research (IMR), P.O. Box 1870 Nordnes, 5817 Bergen, Norway
2
Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Bergen, 5020 Bergen, Norway
3
Department of Psychology, University of Oslo, 0317 Oslo, Norway
4
Division of Infection Control and Environmental Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, 0456 Oslo, Norway
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2018, 10(4), 513; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10040513
Received: 22 March 2018 / Revised: 14 April 2018 / Accepted: 18 April 2018 / Published: 20 April 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Iodine and Health throughout the Lifecourse)
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Abstract

Iodine sufficiency is particularly important in pregnancy, where median urinary iodine concentration (UIC) in the range of 150–250 µg/L indicates adequate iodine status. The aims of this study were to determine UIC and assess if dietary and maternal characteristics influence the iodine status in pregnant Norwegian women. The study comprises a cross-sectional population-based prospective cohort of pregnant women (Little in Norway (LiN)). Median UIC in 954 urine samples was 85 µg/L and 78.4% of the samples (n = 748) were ≤150 µg/L. 23.2% (n = 221) of the samples were ≤50 µg/L and 5.2% (n = 50) were above the requirements of iodine intake (>250 µg/L). Frequent iodine-supplement users (n = 144) had significantly higher UIC (120 µg/L) than non-frequent users (75 µg/L). Frequent milk and dairy product consumers (4–9 portions/day) had significantly higher UIC (99 µg/L) than women consuming 0–1 portion/day (57 µg/L) or 2–3 portions/day (83 µg/L). Women living in mid-Norway (n = 255) had lowest UIC (72 µg/L). In conclusion, this study shows that the diet of the pregnant women did not necessarily secure a sufficient iodine intake. There is an urgent need for public health strategies to secure adequate iodine nutrition among pregnant women in Norway. View Full-Text
Keywords: urinary iodine concentration; iodine to creatinine ratio; supplement; milk and dairy products; seafood; iodine status; pregnant urinary iodine concentration; iodine to creatinine ratio; supplement; milk and dairy products; seafood; iodine status; pregnant
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Dahl, L.; Wik Markhus, M.; Sanchez, P.V.R.; Moe, V.; Smith, L.; Meltzer, H.M.; Kjellevold, M. Iodine Deficiency in a Study Population of Norwegian Pregnant Women—Results from the Little in Norway Study (LiN). Nutrients 2018, 10, 513.

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