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Nutrients 2018, 10(12), 1887; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10121887

Managing Risk of Non-Communicable Diseases in Women with Bulimia Nervosa or Binge Eating Disorders: A Randomized Trial with 12 Months Follow-Up

1
Department of Sports Medicine, Norwegian School of Sport Sciences; Sognsvegen 220, 0806 Oslo, Norway
2
Department of Psychology, Faculty of Health Sciences, UiT- the Arctic University of Norway, N-9037 Tromsø, Norway
3
Department of Sports and Physical Education and Outdoor Sciences, University of South-Eastern Norway, N-3800 Bø in Telemark, Norway
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 14 November 2018 / Revised: 27 November 2018 / Accepted: 28 November 2018 / Published: 3 December 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Eating Disorders and Obesity: The Challenge for Our Times)
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Abstract

Persons with bulimia nervosa (BN) or binge eating disorder (BED) have an elevated risk of non-communicable diseases (NCDs). However, lowering this risk is rarely addressed in standard cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT). We aimed to compare CBT with an intervention combining physical exercise and dietary therapy (PED-t), and hypothesized that the PED-t would do better than CBT in lowering the risk of NCD both initially and longitudinally. In this study, 164 women with bulimia nervosa or binge eating disorder were randomly assigned to 16-weeks of outpatient group therapy with either PED-t or CBT. Body composition (BC) was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Measures of physical fitness (VO2peak and one repetition maximum (1RM) in squats, bench press, and seated row) were also recorded. All measurements were completed baseline, post-treatment, and at 6- and 12-month follow-ups, respectively. Our results showed that PED-t improved more than CBT on mean (99% CI) absolute Vo2peak; 57,2 (84.4, 198.8) mL (g = 0.22, p < 0.001) post-treatment. There were small to medium long-term differences in 1RM after PED-t compared to CBT. BC deteriorated in both groups during follow-up. Neither the PED-t nor the CBT lowered the risk for NCDs. Clearly, other approaches need to be considered to promote physical fitness and lower the risk of NCDs among individuals with BN and BED. View Full-Text
Keywords: physical fitness; visceral adipose tissue; obesity; eating disorders; nutrition; physical activity; exercise; bulimia; binge eating disorder physical fitness; visceral adipose tissue; obesity; eating disorders; nutrition; physical activity; exercise; bulimia; binge eating disorder
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Mathisen, T.F.; Sundgot-Borgen, J.; Rosenvinge, J.H.; Bratland-Sanda, S. Managing Risk of Non-Communicable Diseases in Women with Bulimia Nervosa or Binge Eating Disorders: A Randomized Trial with 12 Months Follow-Up. Nutrients 2018, 10, 1887.

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