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Nutrients 2018, 10(11), 1684; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10111684

Isolation and Characterization of Potentially Probiotic Bacterial Strains from Mice: Proof of Concept for Personalized Probiotics

1
Department of Food and Nutrition, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, São Paulo State University (UNESP), Araraquara 14800-903, SP, Brazil
2
Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Pediatrics, BC Children’s Hospital and the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V5Z 4H4, Canada
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 15 August 2018 / Revised: 11 September 2018 / Accepted: 29 October 2018 / Published: 5 November 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gut Microbiome and Human Health)
Full-Text   |   PDF [3750 KB, uploaded 5 November 2018]   |  

Abstract

Modulation of the gut microbiota through the use of probiotics has been widely used to treat or prevent several intestinal diseases. However, inconsistent results have compromised the efficacy of this approach, especially in severe conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The purpose of our study was to develop a personalized probiotic strategy and assess its efficacy in a murine model of intestinal inflammation. Commensal bacterial strains were isolated from the feces of healthy mice and then administered back to the host as a personalized treatment in dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis. Colonic tissues were collected for histological analysis and to investigate inflammatory markers such as Il-1β, Il-6, TGF-β, and Il-10, and the enzyme myeloperoxidase as a neutrophil marker. The group that received the personalized probiotic showed reduced susceptibility to DSS-colitis as compared to a commercial probiotic. This protection was characterized by a lower disease activity index and reduced histopathological damage in the colon. Moreover, the personalized probiotic was more effective in modulating the host immune response, leading to decreased Il-1β and Il-6 and increased TGF-β and Il-10 expression. In conclusion, our study suggests that personalized probiotics may possess an advantage over commercial probiotics in treating dysbiotic-related conditions, possibly because they are derived directly from the host’s own microbiota. View Full-Text
Keywords: personalized probiotic; microbiota biobank; colitis; IBD; microbiota; Lactobacillus; Bifidobacterium personalized probiotic; microbiota biobank; colitis; IBD; microbiota; Lactobacillus; Bifidobacterium
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Celiberto, L.S.; Pinto, R.A.; Rossi, E.A.; Vallance, B.A.; Cavallini, D.C.U. Isolation and Characterization of Potentially Probiotic Bacterial Strains from Mice: Proof of Concept for Personalized Probiotics. Nutrients 2018, 10, 1684.

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