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Nutrients 2018, 10(10), 1411; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10101411

Preparation of a Defined Gluten Hydrolysate for Diagnosis and Clinical Investigations of Wheat Hypersensitivities

Leibniz-Institute for Food Systems Biology at the Technical University of Munich, 85354 Freising, Germany
Retired.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 10 September 2018 / Accepted: 25 September 2018 / Published: 2 October 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gluten-Free Diet)
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Abstract

Gluten is the trigger for celiac disease (CD), non-celiac gluten/wheat sensitivity (NCGS), and wheat allergy. An oral food challenge is often needed for diagnosis, but there are no standardized gluten challenge materials with known composition available. To fill this gap, two materials, commercially available gluten and a food-grade gluten hydrolysate (pepgluten), were extensively characterized. Pepgluten was prepared from gluten by incubation with a pepsin dietary supplement and acetic acid at 37 °C for 120 min. The components of pepgluten were crude protein (707 mg/g), starch (104 mg/g), water (59 mg/g), fat (47 mg/g), dietary fiber (41 mg/g) and ash (11 mg/g). The protein/peptide fraction of pepgluten (1 g) contained equivalents derived from 369 mg gliadins and 196 mg glutenins, resulting in 565 mg total gluten equivalents, 25 mg albumins/globulins, 22 mg α-amylase/trypsin inhibitors and 48 mg pepsin capsule proteins. The slightly acidic, dough-like smell and bitter taste of pepgluten could be completely camouflaged in multivitamin juice with bitter lemon, grapefruit juice, or vegetable and fruit smoothies. Thus, pepgluten met the criteria for placebo-controlled challenges (active and placebo materials are identical regarding appearance, taste, smell, and texture) and is appropriate as a standard preparation for the oral food challenge and clinical investigations to study wheat hypersensitivities. View Full-Text
Keywords: celiac disease; diagnosis; gliadin; gluten; glutenin; non-celiac gluten sensitivity; oral food challenge; pepsin; wheat allergy celiac disease; diagnosis; gliadin; gluten; glutenin; non-celiac gluten sensitivity; oral food challenge; pepsin; wheat allergy
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Wieser, H.; Scherf, K.A. Preparation of a Defined Gluten Hydrolysate for Diagnosis and Clinical Investigations of Wheat Hypersensitivities. Nutrients 2018, 10, 1411.

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