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Nutrients 2018, 10(10), 1404; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10101404

Nutrigenetic Contributions to Dyslipidemia: A Focus on Physiologically Relevant Pathways of Lipid and Lipoprotein Metabolism

1
Division of Nutritional Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana-Champaign, IL 61801, USA
2
Department of Kinesiology and Community Health, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana-Champaign, IL 61801, USA
3
Department of Human Development and Family Studies, Cooperative Extension, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Carle Illinois College of Medicine, Urbana-Champaign, IL 61801, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 28 August 2018 / Revised: 19 September 2018 / Accepted: 27 September 2018 / Published: 2 October 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diet, Lipid and Lipoprotein Metabolism and Human Health)
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Abstract

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the number one cause of death worldwide, and dyslipidemia is a major predictor of CVD mortality. Elevated lipid concentrations are the result of multiple genetic and environmental factors. Over 150 genetic loci have been associated with blood lipid levels. However, not all variants are present in pathways relevant to the pathophysiology of dyslipidemia. The study of these physiologically relevant variants can provide mechanistic understanding of dyslipidemia and identify potential novel therapeutic targets. Additionally, dietary fatty acids have been evidenced to exert both positive and negative effects on lipid profiles. The metabolism of both dietary and endogenously synthesized lipids can be affected by individual genetic variation to produce elevated lipid concentrations. This review will explore the genetic, dietary, and nutrigenetic contributions to dyslipidemia. View Full-Text
Keywords: dyslipidemia; nutrigenetics; lipids dyslipidemia; nutrigenetics; lipids
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Hannon, B.A.; Khan, N.A.; Teran-Garcia, M. Nutrigenetic Contributions to Dyslipidemia: A Focus on Physiologically Relevant Pathways of Lipid and Lipoprotein Metabolism. Nutrients 2018, 10, 1404.

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