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Article

Effect of Low Dose Docosahexaenoic Acid-Rich Fish Oil on Plasma Lipids and Lipoproteins in Pre-Menopausal Women: A Dose–Response Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial

1
School of Medicine, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522, Australia
2
Illawarra Medical Research Institute, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522, Australia
3
University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005, Australia
4
Faculty of Health, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC 3220, Australia
5
Department of Nutrition, Dietetics and Food, Monash University, Notting Hill, VIC 3168, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2018, 10(10), 1460; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10101460
Received: 27 August 2018 / Revised: 14 September 2018 / Accepted: 21 September 2018 / Published: 8 October 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diet, Lipid and Lipoprotein Metabolism and Human Health)
Omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-3 LCPUFA) supplementation has been shown to improve plasma lipid profiles in men and post-menopausal women, however, data for pre-menopausal women are lacking. The benefits of intakes less than 1 g/day have not been well studied, and dose–response data is limited. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of low doses of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-rich tuna oil on plasma triglyceride (TG) lowering in pre-menopausal women, and investigate if low dose DHA-rich tuna oil supplementation would increase the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particle sizes. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted, in which 53 healthy pre-menopausal women with mildly elevated plasma TG levels consumed 0, 0.35, 0.7, or 1 g/day n-3 LCPUFA as HiDHA™ tuna oil or placebo (Sunola oil) capsules for 8 weeks. Supplementation with 1 g/day n-3 LCPUFA, but not lower doses, reduced plasma TG by 23% in pre-menopausal women. This was reflected in a dose-dependent reduction in very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL)-TG (R2 = 0.20, p = 0.003). A weak dose-dependent shift in HDL (but not LDL) particle size was identified (R2 = 0.05, p = 0.04). The results of this study indicate that DHA-rich n-3 LCPUFA supplementation at a dose of 1 g/day is an effective TG-lowering agent and increases HDL particle size in pre-menopausal women. View Full-Text
Keywords: DHA; plasma lipids; lipoproteins; premenopausal women DHA; plasma lipids; lipoproteins; premenopausal women
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MDPI and ACS Style

Sparkes, C.; Gibson, R.; Sinclair, A.; Else, P.L.; Meyer, B.J. Effect of Low Dose Docosahexaenoic Acid-Rich Fish Oil on Plasma Lipids and Lipoproteins in Pre-Menopausal Women: A Dose–Response Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial. Nutrients 2018, 10, 1460. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10101460

AMA Style

Sparkes C, Gibson R, Sinclair A, Else PL, Meyer BJ. Effect of Low Dose Docosahexaenoic Acid-Rich Fish Oil on Plasma Lipids and Lipoproteins in Pre-Menopausal Women: A Dose–Response Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial. Nutrients. 2018; 10(10):1460. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10101460

Chicago/Turabian Style

Sparkes, Cassandra, Robert Gibson, Andrew Sinclair, Paul L. Else, and Barbara J. Meyer 2018. "Effect of Low Dose Docosahexaenoic Acid-Rich Fish Oil on Plasma Lipids and Lipoproteins in Pre-Menopausal Women: A Dose–Response Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial" Nutrients 10, no. 10: 1460. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10101460

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