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Nutrients 2018, 10(10), 1403; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10101403

Effects of Whole Milk Supplementation on Gut Microbiota and Cardiometabolic Biomarkers in Subjects with and without Lactose Malabsorption

1
Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, Hubei Key Laboratory of Food Nutrition and Safety, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030, China
2
Ministry of Education Key Lab of Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030, China
3
Department of Epidemiology, College of Public Health, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA
4
Departments of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 29 August 2018 / Revised: 9 September 2018 / Accepted: 21 September 2018 / Published: 2 October 2018
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Abstract

The aim of this study was to compare the impact of whole milk supplementation on gut microbiota and cardiometabolic biomarkers between lactose malabsorbers (LM) and absorbers (LA). We performed a pair-wise intervention study of 31 LM and 31 LA, 1:1 matched by age, sex, body mass index, and daily dairy intake. Subjects were required to add 250 mL/day whole milk for four weeks in their routine diet. At the beginning and the end of the intervention period, we collected data on gut microbiota and cardiometabolic biomarkers. Whole milk supplementation significantly increased Actinobacteria (P < 0.01), Bifidobacterium (P < 0.01), Anaerostipe (P < 0.01), and Blautia (P = 0.04), and decreased Megamonas (P = 0.04) in LM, but not LA. Microbial richness and diversity were not affected. The fecal levels of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) remained stable throughout the study. Body fat mass (P < 0.01) and body fat percentage (P < 0.01) reduced in both groups, but the changes did not differ between groups. No significant differences in other cardiometabolic markers were found between LM and LA. When compared with LA, whole milk supplementation could alter the intestinal microbiota composition in LM, without significant changes in fecal SCFAs and cardiometabolic biomarkers. View Full-Text
Keywords: lactose malabsorption; milk; gut microbiota; Bifidobacterium; short-chain fatty acids lactose malabsorption; milk; gut microbiota; Bifidobacterium; short-chain fatty acids
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Li, X.; Yin, J.; Zhu, Y.; Wang, X.; Hu, X.; Bao, W.; Huang, Y.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Yang, W.; Shan, Z.; Liu, L. Effects of Whole Milk Supplementation on Gut Microbiota and Cardiometabolic Biomarkers in Subjects with and without Lactose Malabsorption. Nutrients 2018, 10, 1403.

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