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Article

Multidimensional Assessment of Lake Water Ecosystem Services Using Remote Sensing

by 1,2,3, 1,3 and 2,*
1
College of Surveying and Geo-Informatics, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092, China
2
Department of Geography, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996, USA
3
Technology Innovation Center for Land Spatial Eco-Restoration in the Metropolitan Area, MNR, Shanghai 200003, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Bingfang Wu, Yuan Zeng and Dan Zhao
Remote Sens. 2021, 13(17), 3540; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13173540
Received: 8 June 2021 / Revised: 28 August 2021 / Accepted: 31 August 2021 / Published: 6 September 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Remote Sensing of Ecosystems)
Freshwater is becoming scarce worldwide with the rapidly growing population, developing industries, burgeoning agriculture, and increasing consumption. Assessment of ecosystem services has been regarded as a promising way to reconcile the increasing demand and depleting natural resources. In this paper, we proposed a multidimensional assessment framework for evaluating water provisioning ecosystem services by integrating multi-source remote sensing products. We applied the multidimensional framework to assess lake water ecosystem services in the state of Minnesota, US. We found that: (1) the water provisioning ecosystem services degraded during 1998–2018 from three assessment perspectives; (2) the output, efficiency, and trend indices have stable distribution and various spatial clustering patterns from 1998 to 2018; (3) high-level efficiency depends on high-level output, and low-level output relates to low-level efficiency; (4) Western Minnesota, including Northwest, West Central, and Southwest, degraded more severely than other zones in water provisioning services; (5) human activities impact water provisioning services in Minnesota more than climate changes. These findings can benefit policymakers by identifying the priorities for better protection, conservation, and restoration of lake ecosystems. Our multidimensional assessment framework can be adapted to evaluate ecosystem services in other regions. View Full-Text
Keywords: multidimensional assessment; water provisioning ecosystem services; lake water storage; surface water; remote sensing; Google Earth Engine multidimensional assessment; water provisioning ecosystem services; lake water storage; surface water; remote sensing; Google Earth Engine
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MDPI and ACS Style

Shi, D.; Shi, Y.; Wu, Q. Multidimensional Assessment of Lake Water Ecosystem Services Using Remote Sensing. Remote Sens. 2021, 13, 3540. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13173540

AMA Style

Shi D, Shi Y, Wu Q. Multidimensional Assessment of Lake Water Ecosystem Services Using Remote Sensing. Remote Sensing. 2021; 13(17):3540. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13173540

Chicago/Turabian Style

Shi, Donghui, Yishao Shi, and Qiusheng Wu. 2021. "Multidimensional Assessment of Lake Water Ecosystem Services Using Remote Sensing" Remote Sensing 13, no. 17: 3540. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13173540

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