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Article

Modeling the Spectral Properties of Obtrusive Light Incident on a Window: Application to Montréal, Canada

1
Department of Physics, Cégep de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC J1E 4K1, Canada
2
Département de Géomatique Appliquée, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC J1H 2R1, Canada
3
Physics Department, Bishop’s University, Sherbrooke, QC J1M 1Z7, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Yuyu Zhou
Remote Sens. 2021, 13(14), 2767; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13142767
Received: 11 June 2021 / Revised: 5 July 2021 / Accepted: 10 July 2021 / Published: 14 July 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Light Pollution Monitoring Using Remote Sensing Data)
This paper describes the use of a new obtrusive light module of the Illumina v2 model to estimate the light that may enter bedroom windows. We used the following as input to the model: (1) the sources’ flux and spectrum derived from the color images taken by astronauts from the International Space Station (ISS), (2) an association between source spectrum and angular emission, and (3) a per zone inventory of obstacles properties and lamp height. The model calculates the spectral irradiance incident to buildings’ windows taking into account the orientation of the street. By using the color information from an ISS image, we can classify pixels as a function of their spectra. With the same image, it is also possible to determine the upward photopic radiance for each pixel. Both serve as inputs to the model to calculate the spectral irradiance on any window. By having the spectral irradiance, it is possible to determine the Melatonin Suppression Index and the photopic irradiance on the window. Such information can later be used to perform epidemiological studies. The new methodology is applied to the city of Montréal in Canada for a set of houses’ locations. The computations are made for 2013 (pre-LED era). View Full-Text
Keywords: human health; light pollution; modeling; street light; Montréal; melatonin suppression; obtrusive light human health; light pollution; modeling; street light; Montréal; melatonin suppression; obtrusive light
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MDPI and ACS Style

Aubé, M.; Houle, J.-P.; Desmarais, J.; Veilleux, N.; Bordeleau, É. Modeling the Spectral Properties of Obtrusive Light Incident on a Window: Application to Montréal, Canada. Remote Sens. 2021, 13, 2767. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13142767

AMA Style

Aubé M, Houle J-P, Desmarais J, Veilleux N, Bordeleau É. Modeling the Spectral Properties of Obtrusive Light Incident on a Window: Application to Montréal, Canada. Remote Sensing. 2021; 13(14):2767. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13142767

Chicago/Turabian Style

Aubé, Martin, Julien-Pierre Houle, Justine Desmarais, Nikki Veilleux, and Émie Bordeleau. 2021. "Modeling the Spectral Properties of Obtrusive Light Incident on a Window: Application to Montréal, Canada" Remote Sensing 13, no. 14: 2767. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13142767

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