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Article

First Estimation of Global Trends in Nocturnal Power Emissions Reveals Acceleration of Light Pollution

1
Environment and Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter, Penryn, Cornwall TR10 9FE, UK
2
Dept. Física de la Tierra y Astrofísica, Instituto de Física de Partículas y del COSMOS (IPARCOS), Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid, Spain
3
Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía, Glorieta de la Astronomía, s/n, 18008 Granada, Spain
4
Centre for Geography and Environmental Science, University of Exeter, Penryn, Cornwall TR10 9FE, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally.
Academic Editor: Xuecao Li
Remote Sens. 2021, 13(16), 3311; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13163311
Received: 8 July 2021 / Revised: 16 August 2021 / Accepted: 19 August 2021 / Published: 21 August 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Light Pollution Monitoring Using Remote Sensing Data)
The global spread of artificial light is eroding the natural night-time environment. The estimation of the pattern and rate of growth of light pollution on multi-decadal scales has nonetheless proven challenging. Here we show that the power of global satellite observable light emissions increased from 1992 to 2017 by at least 49%. We estimate the hidden impact of the transition to solid-state light-emitting diode (LED) technology, which increases emissions at visible wavelengths undetectable to existing satellite sensors, suggesting that the true increase in radiance in the visible spectrum may be as high as globally 270% and 400% on specific regions. These dynamics vary by region, but there is limited evidence that advances in lighting technology have led to decreased emissions. View Full-Text
Keywords: ALAN; artificial light at night; astronomy; DMSP; LEDs; light pollution; melatonin; nocturnal ecology; VIIRS ALAN; artificial light at night; astronomy; DMSP; LEDs; light pollution; melatonin; nocturnal ecology; VIIRS
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MDPI and ACS Style

Sánchez de Miguel, A.; Bennie, J.; Rosenfeld, E.; Dzurjak, S.; Gaston, K.J. First Estimation of Global Trends in Nocturnal Power Emissions Reveals Acceleration of Light Pollution. Remote Sens. 2021, 13, 3311. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13163311

AMA Style

Sánchez de Miguel A, Bennie J, Rosenfeld E, Dzurjak S, Gaston KJ. First Estimation of Global Trends in Nocturnal Power Emissions Reveals Acceleration of Light Pollution. Remote Sensing. 2021; 13(16):3311. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13163311

Chicago/Turabian Style

Sánchez de Miguel, Alejandro, Jonathan Bennie, Emma Rosenfeld, Simon Dzurjak, and Kevin J. Gaston 2021. "First Estimation of Global Trends in Nocturnal Power Emissions Reveals Acceleration of Light Pollution" Remote Sensing 13, no. 16: 3311. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13163311

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