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Article

Comparison of Thermal Infrared-Derived Maps of Irrigated and Non-Irrigated Vegetation in Urban and Non-Urban Areas of Southern California

1
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109, USA
2
Department of Biology, Harvey Mudd College, 301 Platt Boulevard, Claremont, CA 91711, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Remote Sens. 2020, 12(24), 4102; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs12244102
Received: 22 November 2020 / Revised: 9 December 2020 / Accepted: 12 December 2020 / Published: 15 December 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Irrigation Mapping Using Satellite Remote Sensing)
It is important to understand the distribution of irrigated and non-irrigated vegetation in rapidly expanding urban areas that are experiencing climate-induced changes in water availability, such as Los Angeles, California. Mapping irrigated vegetation in Los Angeles is necessary for developing sustainable water use practices and accurately accounting for the megacity’s carbon exchange and water balance changes. However, pre-existing maps of irrigated vegetation are largely limited to agricultural regions and are too coarse to resolve heterogeneous urban landscapes. Previous research suggests that irrigation has a strong cooling effect on vegetation, especially in semi-arid environments. The July 2018 launch of the ECOsystem Spaceborne Thermal Radiometer on Space Station (ECOSTRESS) offers an opportunity to test this hypothesis using retrieved land surface temperature (LST) data in complex, heterogeneous urban/non-urban environments. In this study, we leverage Landsat 8 optical imagery and 30 m sharpened afternoon summertime ECOSTRESS LST, then apply very high-resolution (0.6–10 m) vegetation fraction weighting to produce a map of irrigated and non-irrigated vegetation in Los Angeles. This classification was compared to other classifications using different combinations of sensors in order to offer a preliminary accuracy and uncertainty assessment. This approach verifies that ECOSTRESS LST data provides an accurate map (98.2% accuracy) of irrigated urban vegetation in southern California that has the potential to reduce uncertainties in regional carbon and hydrological cycle models. View Full-Text
Keywords: remote sensing; urban land cover; ECOSTRESS; thermal imagery; irrigation; Google Earth Engine remote sensing; urban land cover; ECOSTRESS; thermal imagery; irrigation; Google Earth Engine
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Graphical abstract

  • Externally hosted supplementary file 1
    Doi: 10.17632/x2zmf7z2zw.2
    Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.17632/x2zmf7z2zw.2
    Description: This dataset represents a high-resolution irrigated land use map across the Southern California Air Basin (SoCAB) with a spatial resolution of 30 m. This map was developed to support urban biospheric CO2 and hydrological modeling in Los Angeles, CA. The map distinguishes between irrigated and non-irrigated vegetation and masks out all non-vegetated surfaces in SoCAB. The land use map was derived from a combination of vegetation-fraction weighted ECOSTRESS land surface temperature (LST) imagery and Landsat-8 optical imagery.
MDPI and ACS Style

Coleman, R.W.; Stavros, N.; Hulley, G.; Parazoo, N. Comparison of Thermal Infrared-Derived Maps of Irrigated and Non-Irrigated Vegetation in Urban and Non-Urban Areas of Southern California. Remote Sens. 2020, 12, 4102. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs12244102

AMA Style

Coleman RW, Stavros N, Hulley G, Parazoo N. Comparison of Thermal Infrared-Derived Maps of Irrigated and Non-Irrigated Vegetation in Urban and Non-Urban Areas of Southern California. Remote Sensing. 2020; 12(24):4102. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs12244102

Chicago/Turabian Style

Coleman, Red W., Natasha Stavros, Glynn Hulley, and Nicholas Parazoo. 2020. "Comparison of Thermal Infrared-Derived Maps of Irrigated and Non-Irrigated Vegetation in Urban and Non-Urban Areas of Southern California" Remote Sensing 12, no. 24: 4102. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs12244102

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