Next Article in Journal
DAHP–TOPSIS-Based Channel Decision Model for Co-Operative CR-Enabled Internet on Vehicle (CR-IoV)
Next Article in Special Issue
Socio-Economic Life Cycle-Based Framework for Safe and Sustainable Design of Engineered Nanomaterials and Nano-Enabled Products
Previous Article in Journal
Empowering Collections-Based Organizations to Participate in Agenda 2030: The “Our Collections Matter Toolkit”
Article

Testing the Applicability of the Safe-by-Design Concept: A Theoretical Case Study Using Polymer Nanoclay Composites for Coffee Capsules

1
Department of Nanobiotechnology, Institute for Synthetic Bioarchitectures, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Muthgasse 11/II, 1190 Vienna, Austria
2
Institute of Technology Assessment, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Apostelgasse 23, 1030 Vienna, Austria
3
Department of Water-Atmosphere-Environment, Institute of Waste Management, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Muthgasse 107, 1190 Vienna, Austria
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Danail Hristozov and Lisa Pizzol
Sustainability 2021, 13(24), 13951; https://doi.org/10.3390/su132413951
Received: 30 October 2021 / Revised: 5 December 2021 / Accepted: 9 December 2021 / Published: 17 December 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainable Innovation and Risk Governance for Emerging Technologies)
The production and use of engineered nanomaterials and nano-enabled products is increasing, enabling innovations in many application areas, e.g., in the sector of food contact materials. However, nanosafety-relevant information for chemical risk assessment is still scarce, leading to a high level of uncertainty and making the early integration of safety to the innovation process indispensable. This study analyzed the strengths, weaknesses, and applicability of the nano-specific Safe-by-Design (SbD) concept using nanoclay-containing polymer coffee capsules as a theoretical case study. In addition, a material flow analysis was conducted to identify exposure pathways and potential risks, and a multi-stakeholder approach was applied to discursively discuss challenges when attempting to combine safety and innovation at an early stage. The results indicate that the SbD concept is generally welcomed by all stakeholders, but there is a lack of clear rules on the transfer of information between the actors involved. Furthermore, a voluntary, practical application usually requires in-depth knowledge of nanotechnology and often additional financial efforts. Therefore, incentives need to be created, as there is currently no obvious added value from a company’s point of view. The SbD concept should be further developed, standardized, and integrated into existing legal frameworks to be implemented effectively. View Full-Text
Keywords: Safe-by-Design; chemical risk management; risk governance; nanomaterials; food contact materials; polymer nanocomposites; coffee capsules; nanoclay Safe-by-Design; chemical risk management; risk governance; nanomaterials; food contact materials; polymer nanocomposites; coffee capsules; nanoclay
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

MDPI and ACS Style

Pavlicek, A.; Part, F.; Gressler, S.; Rose, G.; Gazsó, A.; Ehmoser, E.-K.; Huber-Humer, M. Testing the Applicability of the Safe-by-Design Concept: A Theoretical Case Study Using Polymer Nanoclay Composites for Coffee Capsules. Sustainability 2021, 13, 13951. https://doi.org/10.3390/su132413951

AMA Style

Pavlicek A, Part F, Gressler S, Rose G, Gazsó A, Ehmoser E-K, Huber-Humer M. Testing the Applicability of the Safe-by-Design Concept: A Theoretical Case Study Using Polymer Nanoclay Composites for Coffee Capsules. Sustainability. 2021; 13(24):13951. https://doi.org/10.3390/su132413951

Chicago/Turabian Style

Pavlicek, Anna, Florian Part, Sabine Gressler, Gloria Rose, André Gazsó, Eva-Kathrin Ehmoser, and Marion Huber-Humer. 2021. "Testing the Applicability of the Safe-by-Design Concept: A Theoretical Case Study Using Polymer Nanoclay Composites for Coffee Capsules" Sustainability 13, no. 24: 13951. https://doi.org/10.3390/su132413951

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop