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Open AccessArticle

Applying a Social–Ecological Systems Approach to Understanding Local Marine Management Trajectories in Northern Mozambique

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Coastal Oceans Research and Development—Indian Ocean (CORDIO East Africa), Mombasa Box 10135-80101, Kenya
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Department of Environment and Geography, University of York, Heslington YO10 5NG, UK
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Interdisciplinary Centre of Social Sciences (CICS.NOVA), Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities, Nova University of Lisbon (NOVA FCSH), Av. de Berna 26-C, 1069-061 Lisbon, Portugal
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The Landscapes and Livelihoods Group (TLLG), Edinburgh EH3 5QU, Scotland, UK
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Conservation and Policy, Zoological Society of London, London NW1 4RY, UK
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Associação do Meio Ambiente (AMA), Rua 15, Casa 872 P.O., Pemba Box 3200, Cabo Delgado, Mozambique
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2020, 12(9), 3904; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12093904
Received: 21 April 2020 / Revised: 5 May 2020 / Accepted: 7 May 2020 / Published: 11 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Socio-Ecological Systems Sustainability)
This study applied the social–ecological systems framework (SESF) to six fishing communities in northern Mozambique where marine resource management is being implemented through the Our Sea Our Life project. Data on 11 variables and 27 indicators were organised using the SESF to represent the key system dimensions (Governance system, Actors, Resource units and Resource system). Variables within each dimension were weighed to a cumulative score of one. High scores (> 0.50) for Governance system occurred where communities had fisheries management rules and good knowledge of fishing gear regulations. High scores for Actors were evident in communities with few migrant fishers and high participation in village savings and loans associations. Elevated scores of the Resource units occurred where fishers targeted a variety of fish taxa. A healthy Resource system was found in communities neighbouring highly productive and resilient reefs, characterised by high fish biomass and diversity. The status of social and ecological conditions coupled with initial levels of project support and quality of technical support were linked with project achievements. Application of the SESF is therefore valuable in understanding interdependent linkages between social and environmental conditions to inform the design of localised management interventions for social–ecological sustainability. View Full-Text
Keywords: co-management; locally managed marine areas; artisanal fisheries; social capital; social and ecological interventions co-management; locally managed marine areas; artisanal fisheries; social capital; social and ecological interventions
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MDPI and ACS Style

Osuka, K.; Rosendo, S.; Riddell, M.; Huet, J.; Daide, M.; Chauque, E.; Samoilys, M. Applying a Social–Ecological Systems Approach to Understanding Local Marine Management Trajectories in Northern Mozambique. Sustainability 2020, 12, 3904.

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