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Deployable Membrane-Based Energy Technologies: the Ethiopian Prospect

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Department of Chemistry, College of Natural and Computational Science, Jigjiga University, P.O. Box 1020 Jigjiga, Ethiopia
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University Grenoble Alpes, University Savoie Mont Blanc, CNRS, Grenoble INP, LEPMI, 38 000 Grenoble, France
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Materials Science Program/Department of Chemistry, Addis Ababa University, P. O. Box 1176 Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
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Advanced Membranes and Porous Materials Center (AMPM), King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Thuwal 23955–6900, Saudi Arabia
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Biological and Environmental Science and Engineering Division (BESE), Red Sea Research Center, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Thuwal 23955–6900, Saudi Arabia
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Department of Energy Conversion and Storage, Technical University of Denmark, Building 310,2800 Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark
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Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2020, 12(21), 8792; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12218792
Received: 4 October 2020 / Revised: 18 October 2020 / Accepted: 20 October 2020 / Published: 22 October 2020
Membrane-based energy technologies are presently gaining huge interest due to the fundamental engineering and potentially broad range of applications, with economic advantages over some of the competing technologies. Herein, we assess the potential deployability of the existing and emerging membrane-based energy technologies (MEnT) in Ethiopia. First, the status of the current energy technologies is provided along with the active energy and environmental policies to shape the necessary research strategies for technology planning and implementation. Ethiopia is a landlocked country, which limits the effective extraction of energy, for instance, from seawater using alternative, clean technologies such as reverse electrodialysis and pressure retarded osmosis. However, there exists an excess off-grid solar power (up to 5 MW) and wind which can be used to drive water electrolyzers for hydrogen production. Hydrogen is a versatile energy carrier that, for instance, can be used in fuel cells providing zero-emission solutions for transport and mobility. Although Ethiopia is not among the largest CO2 emitters, with more than 90% energy supply obtained from waste and biomass, the economic and industrial growth still calls for alternative CO2 capture and use technologies, which are highlighted in this work. We believe that the present work provides (i) the status and potential for the implementation of MEnT in Ethiopia (ii) and basic guidance for researchers exploring new energy pathways toward sustainable development in developing countries. View Full-Text
Keywords: Ion-exchange membranes; fuel cells; electrolyzers; salinity gradient power; CO2 capture and use Ion-exchange membranes; fuel cells; electrolyzers; salinity gradient power; CO2 capture and use
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MDPI and ACS Style

Besha, A.T.; Tsehaye, M.T.; Tiruye, G.A.; Gebreyohannes, A.Y.; Awoke, A.; Tufa, R.A. Deployable Membrane-Based Energy Technologies: the Ethiopian Prospect. Sustainability 2020, 12, 8792. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12218792

AMA Style

Besha AT, Tsehaye MT, Tiruye GA, Gebreyohannes AY, Awoke A, Tufa RA. Deployable Membrane-Based Energy Technologies: the Ethiopian Prospect. Sustainability. 2020; 12(21):8792. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12218792

Chicago/Turabian Style

Besha, Abreham T., Misgina T. Tsehaye, Girum A. Tiruye, Abaynesh Y. Gebreyohannes, Aymere Awoke, and Ramato A. Tufa 2020. "Deployable Membrane-Based Energy Technologies: the Ethiopian Prospect" Sustainability 12, no. 21: 8792. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12218792

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