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Audiology Research is published by MDPI from Volume 10 Issue 2 (2020). Previous articles were published by another publisher in Open Access under a CC-BY (or CC-BY-NC-ND) licence, and they are hosted by MDPI on mdpi.com as a courtesy and upon agreement with PAGEPress.

Audiol. Res., Volume 8, Issue 1 (March 2018) – 5 articles

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Case Report
Asymmetric Hearing Loss and Chronic Dizziness in a Patient with Idiopathic Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus
Audiol. Res. 2018, 8(1), 5-8; https://doi.org/10.4081/audiores.2018.200 - 06 Jun 2018
Viewed by 498
Abstract
We report a case of a 54-year old female patient, complaining for chronic dizziness, hearing loss, tension headaches without aura, postural instability and gait dysfunction. The patient referred having these symptoms from 1992, but the last few months she experienced a noticeable aggravation [...] Read more.
We report a case of a 54-year old female patient, complaining for chronic dizziness, hearing loss, tension headaches without aura, postural instability and gait dysfunction. The patient referred having these symptoms from 1992, but the last few months she experienced a noticeable aggravation of the symptoms. A magnetic resonance imaging test revealed a triventricular hydrocephalus, not associated with signs of intracranial hypertension decompensation. The ENT-Audiology evaluation revealed a bilateral sensorineural hearing loss with a conductive component, video-nystagmography resulted in an areflexia of the right ear and a reduced vestibular activity for the left ear. Auditory brainstem response test was also carried out and showed pathologic findings for the latencies of the waves I-III, III-V and I-V bilaterally but more significant in the right ear. On January 2016 the patient had endoscopic third ventriculostomy. On the follow up the patient referred an important subjective improvement regarding instability and gait dysfunction. In this paper we study the correlation between hydrocephalus, hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction. Full article
Article
Awareness of Musicians on Ear Protection and Tinnitus: A Preliminary Study
Audiol. Res. 2018, 8(1), 9-12; https://doi.org/10.4081/audiores.2018.198 - 23 May 2018
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 532
Abstract
Music induced hearing loss (MIHL) is linked to chronic, extended exposure, and progress at a rate proportionate to exposure conditions. The aim was to document hearing deterioration; awareness of ear protection devices (EPDs); presence of tinnitus, measurement of temporary threshold shift. Thirty-four musicians [...] Read more.
Music induced hearing loss (MIHL) is linked to chronic, extended exposure, and progress at a rate proportionate to exposure conditions. The aim was to document hearing deterioration; awareness of ear protection devices (EPDs); presence of tinnitus, measurement of temporary threshold shift. Thirty-four musicians filled a questionnaire regarding: years of experience, instrument/splayed, hours of music exposure per week with/without amplification, through earphones and speakers, use of EPDs and tinnitus. Hearing screening in five subjects was done before and after one hour and ten minutes of practice session. Among the participants, 8.8% reported hearing deterioration subjectively and 38.2% reported unilateral intermittent tinnitus, 79.4% lacked awareness about EPDs and 21.6 % were aware but never used them. Mean for temporary threshold shift at 500 Hz and 1 KHz was 5dB HL and 10dBHL at 2 KHz. Musicians are at risk for hearing problems, but the awareness on auditory damage is limited, hence conservative measures must be taken for their well being. Full article
Case Report
Vestibular Paroxysmia in Vestibular Neuritis: A Case Report
Audiol. Res. 2018, 8(1), 24-26; https://doi.org/10.4081/audiores.2018.206 - 11 May 2018
Viewed by 214
Abstract
The term vestibular paroxysmia (VP) was introduced for the first time by Brandt and Dieterich in 1994. In 2016, the Barany Society formulated the International Classification of VP, focusing in particular on the number and duration of attacks, on the differential diagnosis and [...] Read more.
The term vestibular paroxysmia (VP) was introduced for the first time by Brandt and Dieterich in 1994. In 2016, the Barany Society formulated the International Classification of VP, focusing in particular on the number and duration of attacks, on the differential diagnosis and on the therapy. Ephaptic discharges in the proximal part of the eighth cranial nerve, which is covered by oligodendrocytes, are assumed to be the neural basis of VP. We report the first case in literature of an onset of symptoms and signs typical of VP in a young man following acute unilateral vestibular loss not combined with auditory symptoms. Indeed, the pathogenic mechanism affected only the vestibular nerve as confirmed by the presence of a stereotyped nystagmus pattern. The magnetic resonance imaging didn’t reveal any specific cause therefore we suggest the possible role of a neuritis triggering an ephaptic discharge as the neural mechanism of VP. Full article
Article
Electroacoustic Assessment of Wireless Remote Microphone Systems
Audiol. Res. 2018, 8(1), 16-23; https://doi.org/10.4081/audiores.2018.204 - 17 Apr 2018
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 214
Abstract
Wireless remote microphones (RMs) transmit the desired acoustic signal to the hearing aid (HA) and facilitate enhanced listening in challenging environments. Fitting and verification of RMs, and benchmarking the relative performance of different RM devices in varied acoustic environments are of significant interest [...] Read more.
Wireless remote microphones (RMs) transmit the desired acoustic signal to the hearing aid (HA) and facilitate enhanced listening in challenging environments. Fitting and verification of RMs, and benchmarking the relative performance of different RM devices in varied acoustic environments are of significant interest to Audiologists and RM developers. This paper investigates the application of instrumental speech intelligibility and quality metrics for characterizing the RM performance in two acoustic environments with varying amounts of background noise and reverberation. In both environments, two head and torso simulators (HATS) were placed 2 m apart, where one HATS served as the talker and the other served as the listener. Four RM systems were interfaced separately with a HA programmed to match the prescriptive targets for the N4 standard audiogram and placed on the listener HATS. The HA output in varied acoustic conditions was recorded and analyzed offline through computational models predicting speech intelligibility and quality. Results showed performance differences among the four RMs in the presence of noise and/or reverberation, with one RM exhibiting significantly better performance. Clinical implications and applications of these results are discussed. Full article
Case Report
Quality of Life and Speech Perception in Two Late Deafened Adults with Cochlear Implants
Audiol. Res. 2018, 8(1), 1-4; https://doi.org/10.4081/audiores.2018.194 - 06 Mar 2018
Viewed by 354
Abstract
The aim was to demonstrate the need for a quality of life assessment in biopsychosocial aural rehabilitation (AR) practices with late deafened adults (LDAs) with cochlear implants (CIs). We present a case report of a medical records review of two LDAs enrolled in [...] Read more.
The aim was to demonstrate the need for a quality of life assessment in biopsychosocial aural rehabilitation (AR) practices with late deafened adults (LDAs) with cochlear implants (CIs). We present a case report of a medical records review of two LDAs enrolled in a biopsychosocial group AR program. A speech perception test Contrasts for Auditory and Speech Training (CAST) and a quality of life (QoL) assessment the Nijmegen Cochlear Implant Questionnaire (NCIQ) were given prior to AR therapy. CAST scores indicated both patients had excellent basic speech perception. However, NCIQ results revealed patients’ difficulties in basic and advanced listening settings. NCIQ highlighted patients’ self-perceived poor self-esteem and ongoing challenges to their QoL. Speech perception testing results alone are not enough to document the daily challenges of QoL needs of LDAs with CIs. The inclusion of a QoL measure such as the NCIQ is vital in evaluating outcomes of cochlear implantation in LDAs. Full article
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