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Open AccessArticle

Administration of Defective Virus Inhibits Dengue Transmission into Mosquitoes

by Tarunendu Mapder 1,2,*,†, John Aaskov 3 and Kevin Burrage 1,2,4
1
School of Mathematical Sciences, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD 4000, Australia
2
Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Mathematical and Statistical Frontiers, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD 4000, Australia
3
Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD 4059, Australia
4
Department of Computer Science, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3QD, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Current Address: Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Department of Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 46202, USA.
Viruses 2020, 12(5), 558; https://doi.org/10.3390/v12050558
Received: 27 February 2020 / Revised: 22 April 2020 / Accepted: 9 May 2020 / Published: 18 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Computational Biology of Viruses: From Molecules to Epidemics)
The host-vector shuttle and the bottleneck in dengue transmission is a significant aspect with regard to the study of dengue outbreaks. As mosquitoes require 100–1000 times more virus to become infected than human, the transmission of dengue virus from human to mosquito is a vulnerability that can be targeted to improve disease control. In order to capture the heterogeneity in the infectiousness of an infected patient population towards the mosquito population, we calibrate a population of host-to-vector virus transmission models based on an experimentally quantified infected fraction of a mosquito population. Once the population of models is well-calibrated, we deploy a population of controls that helps to inhibit the human-to-mosquito transmission of the dengue virus indirectly by reducing the viral load in the patient body fluid. We use an optimal bang-bang control on the administration of the defective virus (transmissible interfering particles (TIPs)) to symptomatic patients in the course of their febrile period and observe the dynamics in successful reduction of dengue spread into mosquitoes. View Full-Text
Keywords: defective particles; dengue virus; dengue transmission; population of models; mosquito infectious dose defective particles; dengue virus; dengue transmission; population of models; mosquito infectious dose
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Mapder, T.; Aaskov, J.; Burrage, K. Administration of Defective Virus Inhibits Dengue Transmission into Mosquitoes. Viruses 2020, 12, 558.

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