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Recent Evidence on Bioactive Glass Antimicrobial and Antibiofilm Activity: A Mini-Review

1
Laboratory of Clinical Chemistry and Microbiology, IRCCS Galeazzi Orthopaedic Institute, 20161 Milan, Italy
2
Laboratory of Clinical Microbiology, Department of Biomedical Sciences for Health, University of Milan, 20133 Milan, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Materials 2018, 11(2), 326; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma11020326
Received: 25 January 2018 / Revised: 14 February 2018 / Accepted: 17 February 2018 / Published: 24 February 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Glasses 2017)
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Abstract

Bone defects caused by trauma or pathological events are major clinical and socioeconomic burdens. Thus, the efforts of regenerative medicine have been focused on the development of non-biodegradable materials resembling bone features. Consequently, the use of bioactive glass as a promising alternative to inert graft materials has been proposed. Bioactive glass is a synthetic silica-based material with excellent mechanical properties able to bond to the host bone tissue. Indeed, when immersed in physiological fluids, bioactive glass reacts, developing an apatite layer on the granule’s surface, playing a key role in the osteogenesis process. Moreover, the contact of bioactive glass with biological fluids results in the increase of osmotic pressure and pH due to the leaching of ions from granules’ surface, thus making the surrounding environment hostile to microbial growth. The bioactive glass antimicrobial activity is effective against a wide selection of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, either in planktonic or sessile forms. Furthermore, bioglass is able to reduce pathogens’ biofilm production. For the aforementioned reasons, the use of bioactive glass might be a promising solution for the reconstruction of bone defects, as well as for the treatment and eradication of bone infections, characterized by bone necrosis and destruction of the bone structure. View Full-Text
Keywords: silicate glass; surface functionalization; bioactivity; osteostimulation; bone bonding; bone substitute; antibiofilm activity; antibacterial activity silicate glass; surface functionalization; bioactivity; osteostimulation; bone bonding; bone substitute; antibiofilm activity; antibacterial activity
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Drago, L.; Toscano, M.; Bottagisio, M. Recent Evidence on Bioactive Glass Antimicrobial and Antibiofilm Activity: A Mini-Review. Materials 2018, 11, 326.

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