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Materials 2017, 10(11), 1261; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma10111261

Mineral Trioxide Aggregate—A Review of Properties and Testing Methodologies

1
School of Dentistry, University of Queensland, Herston, Brisbane 4004, Australia
2
School of Chemical Engineering, University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Brisbane 4067, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 15 September 2017 / Revised: 23 October 2017 / Accepted: 24 October 2017 / Published: 2 November 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dental Biomaterials 2017)
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Abstract

Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) restoratives and MTA sealers are commonly used in endodontics. Commonly referenced standards for testing of MTA are ISO 6876, 9917-1 and 10993. A PubMed search was performed relating to the relevant tests within each ISO and “mineral trioxide aggregate”. MTA restoratives are typically tested with a mixture of tests from multiple standards. As the setting of MTA is dependent upon hydration, the results of various MTA restoratives and sealers are dependent upon the curing methodology. This includes physical properties after mixing, physical properties after setting and biocompatibility. The tests of flow, film thickness, working time and setting time can be superseded by rheology as it details how MTA hydrates. Physical property tests should replicate physiological conditions, i.e. 37 °C and submerged in physiological solution. Biocompatibility tests should involve immediate placement of samples immediately after mixing rather than being cured prior to placement as this does not replicate clinical usage. Biocompatibility tests should seek to replicate physiological conditions with MTA tested immediately after mixing. View Full-Text
Keywords: hygroscopic dental cement; bioceramic; endodontics; dental materials; biocompatibility; physical properties; setting time; rheology; calcium silicate cement; solubility hygroscopic dental cement; bioceramic; endodontics; dental materials; biocompatibility; physical properties; setting time; rheology; calcium silicate cement; solubility
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Ha, W.N.; Nicholson, T.; Kahler, B.; Walsh, L.J. Mineral Trioxide Aggregate—A Review of Properties and Testing Methodologies. Materials 2017, 10, 1261.

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