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From Clothing Rations to Fast Fashion: Utilising Regenerated Protein Fibres to Alleviate Pressures on Mass Production

1
London College of Fashion, University of the Arts London, London SW1P 4JU, UK
2
School of Design, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Arkadiusz Piwowar and Maciej Dzikuć
Energies 2021, 14(18), 5654; https://doi.org/10.3390/en14185654
Received: 23 August 2021 / Revised: 3 September 2021 / Accepted: 6 September 2021 / Published: 8 September 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Economic Aspects of Low Carbon Development)
Sustainable methods of practice within the fashion and textile industry (FTI) often strive to employ a circular economy that aims to eliminate waste through the continual use of resources. Complex problems such as waste, consumption, and overproduction are heavily intertwined; the main aim of this paper is to report on research focused on re-examining the potential of food waste streams as a commercially viable and circular source of raw materials for the FTI. Herein, regenerated protein fibres (RPFs) from food production waste streams rich in protein have been chosen as the main topic of focus. RPFs have a rich and relevant history from a local manufacturing perspective during wartime and post-war clothing rationing (1941–1949) in the UK. RPFs were used to meet civilian needs for wool-based textiles as part of a wider series of ‘make do and mend’ strategies designed to manage the consumption of new textile products. However, RPFs demonstrated inferior quality in terms of durability when compared to wool-based textiles, a significant contributing factor to the consequent commercial phasing out of RPFs. In today’s take–make–waste model, the FTI landscape can be defined by speed, from slow (high-quality materials and construction, long-lasting products) to fast (seasonal, disposable, low-quality materials and construction), the latter infamous for dire environmental impacts. A key objective of this research is to review the association of quality and longevity within the context of a local and circular fashion economy in which textile quality and lifecycle analysis are holistically matched to the longevity of the textile, garment, or product to reduce waste across the supply chain. View Full-Text
Keywords: waste; regenerated protein fibres; regenerated fibres; textiles; speedcycles; consumption; quality; circular economy; man-made fibres; textile history waste; regenerated protein fibres; regenerated fibres; textiles; speedcycles; consumption; quality; circular economy; man-made fibres; textile history
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MDPI and ACS Style

Stenton, M.; Kapsali, V.; Blackburn, R.S.; Houghton, J.A. From Clothing Rations to Fast Fashion: Utilising Regenerated Protein Fibres to Alleviate Pressures on Mass Production. Energies 2021, 14, 5654. https://doi.org/10.3390/en14185654

AMA Style

Stenton M, Kapsali V, Blackburn RS, Houghton JA. From Clothing Rations to Fast Fashion: Utilising Regenerated Protein Fibres to Alleviate Pressures on Mass Production. Energies. 2021; 14(18):5654. https://doi.org/10.3390/en14185654

Chicago/Turabian Style

Stenton, Marie, Veronika Kapsali, Richard S. Blackburn, and Joseph A. Houghton. 2021. "From Clothing Rations to Fast Fashion: Utilising Regenerated Protein Fibres to Alleviate Pressures on Mass Production" Energies 14, no. 18: 5654. https://doi.org/10.3390/en14185654

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