Next Article in Journal
Perspectives and Intensification of Energy Efficiency in Commercial and Residential Buildings Using Strategic Auditing and Demand-Side Management
Next Article in Special Issue
Ignition of Slurry Fuel Droplets with Different Heating Conditions
Previous Article in Journal
Research of the Energy Losses of Photovoltaic (PV) Modules after Hail Simulation Using a Newly-Created Testbed
Previous Article in Special Issue
Interaction of Liquid Droplets in Gas and Vapor Flows
Open AccessArticle

Effects of Pyrolysis Temperature and Retention Time on Fuel Characteristics of Food Waste Feedstuff and Compost for Co-Firing in Coal Power Plants

1
Division of Environment and Plant Engineering, Korea Institute of Civil Engineering and Building Technology 283, Goyang-daero, Ilsanseo-gu Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do 10223, Korea
2
Department of Construction Environmental Engineering, University of Science and Technology, 217, Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34113, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Energies 2019, 12(23), 4538; https://doi.org/10.3390/en12234538
Received: 2 November 2019 / Revised: 25 November 2019 / Accepted: 27 November 2019 / Published: 28 November 2019
Food waste is an underutilized organic resource given its abundance and high potential energy. The purpose of this study was to confirm the suitability of pyrolyzed food waste as a co-firing fuel by adjusting the pyrolysis temperature (300–500 °C) and retention time (15–60 min). Both high moisture (compost) and low moisture (feedstuff) food waste were examined. Increasing the temperature and retention time yielded more volatile H and O as well as C sequestration, resulting in reduced H/C and O/C ratios. Notably, the van Krevelen diagram increased in similarity to that of coal. Upon pyrolyzing food waste compost, more than half of the chloride was volatilized, the highest carbon content of the compost and feedstuff were 61.35% and 54.12%, respectively, after pyrolysis at 400 °C for 60 min; however, the calorific value of the pyrolyzed feedstuff was reduced owing to the high salt concentration. The pyrolyzed compost and feedstuff had high Ca contents, which contributed to an increased ash fusion temperature. Therefore, food waste byproducts are advantageous as co-firing fuels in terms of energy regeneration. Nevertheless, further research is required regarding the removal of salt and alkali earth metal ion materials. View Full-Text
Keywords: pyrolysis; food waste compost; food waste feedstuff; chlorine; co-firing fuel pyrolysis; food waste compost; food waste feedstuff; chlorine; co-firing fuel
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Lee, Y.-E.; Shin, D.-C.; Jeong, Y.; Kim, I.-T.; Yoo, Y.-S. Effects of Pyrolysis Temperature and Retention Time on Fuel Characteristics of Food Waste Feedstuff and Compost for Co-Firing in Coal Power Plants. Energies 2019, 12, 4538.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop