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Open AccessArticle

Physical Activity Monitoring and Acceptance of a Commercial Activity Tracker in Adult Patients with Haemophilia

1
Physiotherapy in Motion, Multispeciality Research Group (PTinMOTION), Department of Physiotherapy, University of Valencia, Carrer de Gascó Oliag, 5, 46010 Valencia, Spain
2
Intelligent Data Analysis Laboratory, Department of Electronics Engineering, University of Valencia, Avda. Universitat, 46100 Burjassot, Spain
3
Haemostasis and Thrombosis Unit, University and Polytechnic Hospital La Fe, Avinguda de Fernando Abril Martorell, 106, 46026 Valencia, Spain
4
Exercise Intervention for Health Research Group (EXINH-RG), Department of Physiotherapy, University of Valencia, Carrer de Gascó Oliag, 5, 46010 Valencia, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(20), 3851; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16203851
Received: 4 September 2019 / Revised: 1 October 2019 / Accepted: 9 October 2019 / Published: 12 October 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Exercise as a Therapeutic Resource)
Physical activity (PA) is highly beneficial for people with haemophilia (PWH), however, studies that objectively monitor the PA in this population are scarce. This study aimed to monitor the daily PA and analyse its evolution over time in a cohort of PWH using a commercial activity tracker. In addition, this work analyses the relationship between PA levels, demographics, and joint health status, as well as the acceptance and adherence to the activity tracker. Twenty-six PWH were asked to wear a Fitbit Charge HR for 13 weeks. According to the steps/day in the first week, data were divided into two groups: Active Group (AG; ≥10,000 steps/day) and Non-Active Group (NAG; <10,000 steps/day). Correlations between PA and patient characteristics were studied using the Pearson coefficient. Participants’ user experience was analysed with a questionnaire. The 10,000 steps/day was reached by 57.7% of participants, with 12,603 (1525) and 7495 (1626) being the mean steps/day of the AG and NAG, respectively. In general, no significant variations (p > 0.05) in PA levels or adherence to wristband were produced. Only the correlation between very active minutes and arthropathy was significant (r = −0.40, p = 0.045). Results of the questionnaire showed a high level of satisfaction. In summary, PWH are able to comply with the PA recommendations, and the Fitbit wristband is a valid tool for a continuous and long-term monitoring of PA. However, by itself, the use of a wristband is not enough motivation to increase PA levels. View Full-Text
Keywords: exercise; physical activity; haemophilic arthropathy; fitness tracker exercise; physical activity; haemophilic arthropathy; fitness tracker
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Carrasco, J.J.; Pérez-Alenda, S.; Casaña, J.; Soria-Olivas, E.; Bonanad, S.; Querol, F. Physical Activity Monitoring and Acceptance of a Commercial Activity Tracker in Adult Patients with Haemophilia. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 3851.

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