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Mar. Drugs 2019, 17(3), 191; https://doi.org/10.3390/md17030191

Saline Environments as a Source of Potential Quorum Sensing Disruptors to Control Bacterial Infections: A Review

1
Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Granada, 18071 Granada, Spain
2
Institute of Biotechnology, Biomedical Research Center (CIBM), University of Granada, 18100 Granada, Spain
3
Institute for Integrative Biology of the Cell (I2BC), CEA/CNRS/University Paris-Sud, University Paris-Saclay, 91198 Gif-sur-Yvette, France
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 27 February 2019 / Revised: 19 March 2019 / Accepted: 20 March 2019 / Published: 25 March 2019
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Abstract

Saline environments, such as marine and hypersaline habitats, are widely distributed around the world. They include sea waters, saline lakes, solar salterns, or hypersaline soils. The bacteria that live in these habitats produce and develop unique bioactive molecules and physiological pathways to cope with the stress conditions generated by these environments. They have been described to produce compounds with properties that differ from those found in non-saline habitats. In the last decades, the ability to disrupt quorum-sensing (QS) intercellular communication systems has been identified in many marine organisms, including bacteria. The two main mechanisms of QS interference, i.e., quorum sensing inhibition (QSI) and quorum quenching (QQ), appear to be a more frequent phenomenon in marine aquatic environments than in soils. However, data concerning bacteria from hypersaline habitats is scarce. Salt-tolerant QSI compounds and QQ enzymes may be of interest to interfere with QS-regulated bacterial functions, including virulence, in sectors such as aquaculture or agriculture where salinity is a serious environmental issue. This review provides a global overview of the main works related to QS interruption in saline environments as well as the derived biotechnological applications. View Full-Text
Keywords: quorum sensing; QSI; quorum quenching; QQ; marine habitat; saline environment; hypersaline habitat; marine pathogens; plant pathogens; Vibrio quorum sensing; QSI; quorum quenching; QQ; marine habitat; saline environment; hypersaline habitat; marine pathogens; plant pathogens; Vibrio
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Torres, M.; Dessaux, Y.; Llamas, I. Saline Environments as a Source of Potential Quorum Sensing Disruptors to Control Bacterial Infections: A Review. Mar. Drugs 2019, 17, 191.

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