Next Article in Journal
Functional Diversity of Soil Nematodes in Relation to the Impact of Agriculture—A Review
Previous Article in Journal
Flock Size Predicts Niche Breadth and Focal Wintering Regions for a Rapidly Declining Boreal-Breeding Passerine, the Rusty Blackbird
Previous Article in Special Issue
Disentangling the Genetic Relationships of Three Closely Related Bandicoot Species across Southern and Western Australia
Open AccessOpinion

Reducing the Extinction Risk of Populations Threatened by Infectious Diseases

1
School of Life & Environmental Sciences, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
2
San Diego Zoo Global, San Diego, CA 92101, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Michael Wink
Diversity 2021, 13(2), 63; https://doi.org/10.3390/d13020063
Received: 30 November 2020 / Revised: 1 February 2021 / Accepted: 2 February 2021 / Published: 4 February 2021
Extinction risk is increasing for a range of species due to a variety of threats, including disease. Emerging infectious diseases can cause severe declines in wild animal populations, increasing population fragmentation and reducing gene flow. Small, isolated, host populations may lose adaptive potential and become more susceptible to extinction due to other threats. Management of the genetic consequences of disease-induced population decline is often necessary. Whilst disease threats need to be addressed, they can be difficult to mitigate. Actions implemented to conserve the Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii), which has suffered decline to the deadly devil facial tumour disease (DFTD), exemplify how genetic management can be used to reduce extinction risk in populations threatened by disease. Supplementation is an emerging conservation technique that may benefit populations threatened by disease by enabling gene flow and conserving their adaptive potential through genetic restoration. Other candidate species may benefit from genetic management via supplementation but concerns regarding outbreeding depression may prevent widespread incorporation of this technique into wildlife disease management. However, existing knowledge can be used to identify populations that would benefit from supplementation where risk of outbreeding depression is low. For populations threatened by disease and, in situations where disease eradication is not an option, wildlife managers should consider genetic management to buffer the host species against inbreeding and loss of genetic diversity. View Full-Text
Keywords: genetic rescue; genetic restoration; supplementation; disease; genetic diversity; inbreeding; conservation genetic rescue; genetic restoration; supplementation; disease; genetic diversity; inbreeding; conservation
MDPI and ACS Style

Glassock, G.L.; Grueber, C.E.; Belov, K.; Hogg, C.J. Reducing the Extinction Risk of Populations Threatened by Infectious Diseases. Diversity 2021, 13, 63. https://doi.org/10.3390/d13020063

AMA Style

Glassock GL, Grueber CE, Belov K, Hogg CJ. Reducing the Extinction Risk of Populations Threatened by Infectious Diseases. Diversity. 2021; 13(2):63. https://doi.org/10.3390/d13020063

Chicago/Turabian Style

Glassock, Gael L.; Grueber, Catherine E.; Belov, Katherine; Hogg, Carolyn J. 2021. "Reducing the Extinction Risk of Populations Threatened by Infectious Diseases" Diversity 13, no. 2: 63. https://doi.org/10.3390/d13020063

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop