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Article

Density Dependence and Adult Survival Drive Dynamics in Two High Elevation Amphibian Populations

1
Conservation Science Partners, 11050 Pioneer Trail, Suite 202, Truckee, CA 96161, USA
2
National Research Council, Institute of Marine Sciences (CNR-ISMAR), Arsenale, Tesa 104, Castello 2737/F, 30122 Venezia, Italy
3
U.S. Geological Survey, Fort Collins Science Center, 2150 Centre Ave. Bldg C, Fort Collins, CO 80526, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Diversity 2020, 12(12), 478; https://doi.org/10.3390/d12120478
Received: 30 October 2020 / Revised: 4 December 2020 / Accepted: 11 December 2020 / Published: 15 December 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biodiversity and Conservation of Tree Frogs)
Amphibian conservation has progressed from the identification of declines to mitigation, but efforts are hampered by the lack of nuanced information about the effects of environmental characteristics and stressors on mechanistic processes of population regulation. Challenges include a paucity of long-term data and scant information about the relative roles of extrinsic (e.g., weather) and intrinsic (e.g., density dependence) factors. We used a Bayesian formulation of an open population capture-recapture model and >30 years of data to examine intrinsic and extrinsic factors regulating two adult boreal chorus frogs (Pseudacris maculata) populations. We modelled population growth rate and apparent survival directly, assessed their temporal variability, and derived estimates of recruitment. Populations were relatively stable (geometric mean population growth rate >1) and regulated by negative density dependence (i.e., higher population sizes reduced population growth rate). In the smaller population, density dependence also acted on adult survival. In the larger population, higher population growth was associated with warmer autumns. Survival estimates ranged from 0.30–0.87, per-capita recruitment was <1 in most years, and mean seniority probability was >0.50, suggesting adult survival is more important to population growth than recruitment. Our analysis indicates density dependence is a primary driver of population dynamics for P. maculata adults. View Full-Text
Keywords: Anura; Pseudacris; density dependence; long-term data; population growth rate; per-capita recruitment Anura; Pseudacris; density dependence; long-term data; population growth rate; per-capita recruitment
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kissel, A.M.; Tenan, S.; Muths, E. Density Dependence and Adult Survival Drive Dynamics in Two High Elevation Amphibian Populations. Diversity 2020, 12, 478. https://doi.org/10.3390/d12120478

AMA Style

Kissel AM, Tenan S, Muths E. Density Dependence and Adult Survival Drive Dynamics in Two High Elevation Amphibian Populations. Diversity. 2020; 12(12):478. https://doi.org/10.3390/d12120478

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kissel, Amanda M., Simone Tenan, and Erin Muths. 2020. "Density Dependence and Adult Survival Drive Dynamics in Two High Elevation Amphibian Populations" Diversity 12, no. 12: 478. https://doi.org/10.3390/d12120478

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