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Open AccessReview

Kisspeptin and Testicular Function—Is It Necessary?

1
Section of Investigative Medicine, Imperial College, 6th Floor, Commonwealth Building, Hammersmith Hospital, 150 Du Cane Road, London W12 0NN, UK
2
Department of Urology, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, Charing Cross Hospital, Fulham Palace Road, Hammersmith, London W6 8RF, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(8), 2958; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21082958
Received: 12 March 2020 / Revised: 17 April 2020 / Accepted: 21 April 2020 / Published: 22 April 2020
The role of kisspeptin in stimulating hypothalamic GnRH is undisputed. However, the role of kisspeptin signaling in testicular function is less clear. The testes are essential for male reproduction through their functions of spermatogenesis and steroidogenesis. Our review focused on the current literature investigating the distribution, regulation and effects of kisspeptin and its receptor (KISS1/KISS1R) within the testes of species studied to date. There is substantial evidence of localised KISS1/KISS1R expression and peptide distribution in the testes. However, variability is observed in the testicular cell types expressing KISS1/KISS1R. Evidence is presented for modulation of steroidogenesis and sperm function by kisspeptin signaling. However, the physiological importance of such effects, and whether these are paracrine or endocrine manifestations, remain unclear. View Full-Text
Keywords: kisspeptin; kisspeptin receptor; spermatozoa; Leydig cells; Sertoli cells; testes; testosterone; LH; FSH; spermatogenesis kisspeptin; kisspeptin receptor; spermatozoa; Leydig cells; Sertoli cells; testes; testosterone; LH; FSH; spermatogenesis
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MDPI and ACS Style

Sharma, A.; Thaventhiran, T.; Minhas, S.; Dhillo, W.S.; Jayasena, C.N. Kisspeptin and Testicular Function—Is It Necessary? Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21, 2958. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21082958

AMA Style

Sharma A, Thaventhiran T, Minhas S, Dhillo WS, Jayasena CN. Kisspeptin and Testicular Function—Is It Necessary? International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2020; 21(8):2958. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21082958

Chicago/Turabian Style

Sharma, Aditi; Thaventhiran, Thilipan; Minhas, Suks; Dhillo, Waljit S.; Jayasena, Channa N. 2020. "Kisspeptin and Testicular Function—Is It Necessary?" Int. J. Mol. Sci. 21, no. 8: 2958. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21082958

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